Monday, August 13, 2012

Kingmakers in GE13 are not the Chinese voters but all Malaysian voters, whether Malays, Chinese, Indians, Kadazans or Ibans to unite and bring about peaceful transition of federal power to end corruption, cronyism and abuses of power

Kingmakers in GE13 are not the Chinese voters but all Malaysian voters, whether Malays, Chinese, Indians, Kadazans or Ibans to unite and bring about peaceful transition of federal power to end corruption, cronyism and abuses of power

 

  • Lim Kit Siang

 

Former Prime Minister Tun Dr. Mahathir Mohamad is up to his past mischief yesterday when he played the race card to create racial suspicion, mistrust and fear in his effort to save UMNO and Barisan Nasional from being voted out of Federal power in the 13th general election and replaced by Pakatan Rakyat.
Saying that the Chinese voters are the kingmakers for the 13th general election, Mahathir said the Chinese voters will decide who forms the government after the general election as the Malays are divided among three parties.
He claimed that “the Malay majority has split itself into three and become the minority” and the opposition PKR, PAS as well as UMNO have “to cede to Chinese demands”.
As a result, “these three small Malay parties need the support of the Chinese in order to win the elections”.
He said: “Whichever party gets the support of the Chinese will win the elections.
“The fact is today all three Malay parties are trying to butter the Chinese electorate. So they become racial and cater to racial demands.”
What Mahathir said yesterday must rank as among his most irresponsible and mischievous statements, making nonsense of his Vision 2020 and concept of Bangsa Malaysia which envisioned Malaysians “ethnically and territorially integrated, living in harmony and full and fair partnership” by 2020.
Mahathir raised three issues with his latest playing of the race card.
Firstly, is he completely writing off the MCA, Gerakan and SUPP as capable of securing a modicum of Chinese votes in the 13GE? And do the MCA, Gerakan and SUPP leader agree with Mahathir?
Secondly, the Malaysian Chinese are not and do not want to be the “kingmakers” in the 13 general election.
The harsh reality is that the electoral arithmetic does not allow the Chinese voters to be the “kingmakers”.
In any event, what the Chinese voters want is to be able to exercise their fundamental citizenship rights as guaranteed under the Malaysian Constitution to enjoy an equal place under the Malaysian sun, instead of being forced into a Malaysian Diaspora worldwide totally some two million Malaysians in the past four decades because of corrupt, unjust and undemocratic policies and governance.
Incidentally, the Malaysian Diaspora is not confined to Malaysian Chinese but is very multiracial, including an increasing percentage of Malays as well.
Thirdly, the real kingmakers in the 13th general election are not the Chinese voters but all Malaysian voters, whether Malays, Chinese, Indians, Kadazans or Ibans to unite and bring about peaceful transition of federal power for the first time in the 54-year history of the nation to end corruption, cronyism and abuses of power.
Yesterday, Mahathir said that the next general election will be about race.
This is what Mahathir and the UMNO leaders and strategists want the next general election to be about so that they could play the race and fear cards to effect.
Malaysians, regardless of race, religion, class or region must prove Mahathir and the UMNO leaders and strategists wrong, that although Mahathir has himself rubbished the “Bangsa Malaysia concept” just as the Prime Minister, Datuk Seri Najib Razak has made a mockery of his 1Malaysia concept, Malaysians have the chance to show that they have become more Malaysian-minded and patriotic than the UMNO and Barisan Nasional leaders and will respond and rally to Pakatan Rakyat call to vote as Malaysians than just as Malays, Chinese, Indians, Kadazans or Ibans.
The next general election is not a battle between Malays and non-Malay voters but between racialists who want to continue to keep Malaysians in their separate communal compartments and Malaysian nationalists and patriots who want good governance, economic justice, democracy, human rights and national unity and not race to become the dominant election issues.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chinese voters are kingmakers for GE13, says Dr M

June 28, 2012
KUALA LUMPUR, June 28 — Chinese voters will decide who forms the government after the general election which must be held within a year as the Malays are divided among three parties, Tun Dr Mahathir Mohamad said today.
The long-serving former prime minister, whose last election victory in 1999 was widely credited to the swing of Chinese voters to Barisan Nasional (BN), said this forced the opposition PKR, PAS as well as his Umno to cede to Chinese demands.
“They never dreamt that they would be split as they are today. The majority has split itself into three and become the minority. These three small Malay parties need the support of the Chinese in order to win the elections. Whichever party gets the support of the Chinese will win the elections.
“The fact is today all three Malay parties are trying to butter the Chinese electorate. So they become racial and cater to racial demands,” Dr Mahathir (picture), who is still widely influential in Umno despite retiring from active politics nine years ago, told a forum on politics and business today.
Malaysia’s fourth prime minister said he was known as “Mr Malay Ultra” following the 1969 general election which precipitated the country’s worst race riots with up to thousands slain in street clashes.
He won five elections with a two-thirds majority in Parliament after taking power in 1981, including the 1999 polls which followed the controversial sacking of Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim as deputy prime minister, an episode that split the Malay vote and threatened to derail his leadership.
Dr Mahathir said the fact that Chinese supported him in 1999, to the point where DAP stalwarts Lim Kit Siang and Karpal Singh failed to be elected as MPs, “shows the Chinese are not going to vote for their own people if they think they can benefit.”
“So the government must show that even though they look after the welfare of Malays, they do not forget the welfare of others.
“Towards the end of my time as prime minister, I got a lot of support from non-Malays and they were the ones who determined that we had a strong government despite the loss of faith among the Malays,” he added.
Dr Mahathir also said “if Malays are split into three... for your own sake, the non-Malays must support a party that can deliver, and of course the party that can deliver is BN.”
Chinese voters stayed with the ruling coalition in 2004 before disenchantment with Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi, who succeeded Dr Mahathir in 2003, saw them voting for opposition parties in 2008, with analysts estimating that at least 70 per cent still back Pakatan Rakyat (PR).
Dr Mahathir also said today the 13th general election would centre on race as Malaysia has become more racist than ever, putting more pressure on the BN administration which was weak after failing to secure a two-thirds majority in 2008.
“In this country, we are very racist, even more than before. The next election is going to be about race. Who gives what, who gets what based on race. When the government is weak, it caters to demands which are not going to be good for the country in the long run,” he said.
Datuk Seri Najib Razak took power in April 2009, a year after Abdullah led the ruling BN to its worst-ever electoral performance, ceding 82 federal seats and five state governments.
Najib took over from Abdullah ostensibly to improve on BN’s performance in the next general election and observers believe he requires an improvement on the 140 federal seats won and to regain some of the states lost to be assured of remaining in power.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

It’ll be a new govt in Putrajaya

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Constitutional posers for GE13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We have to talk about Najib (10 reasons for polls delay)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pakatan’s to-do list if it wins GE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If truth be told, Najib can't be PM

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GE 13 in 2013?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mother of All Battles - GE13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arrest Mahathir and Win GE-13 in a BIG Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia's 6 prime ministers: When did the corruption and racism start?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essay: Violence and GE 13 (Malaysiakini)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be "conscious" of your political rights, Christians told to vote for a BETTER M'SIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who still cares about the election date? — Lim Sue Goan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snap polls likely in September before Malaysia Day, say sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Najib warns of 'crushed bodies', 'lost lives', 'ethnic cleansing' if status quo not kept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GE 13 : VOTE WISELY, VOTE FOR A BETTER MALAYSIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Indecisive Najib has himself to blame for losing best timing to call for GE-13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R.A.H.M.A.N. Prophesy: Najib may NOT be the 6th Prime Minister

  The R.A.H.M.A.N. prophesy had held true for 39 years since the elevation of Tun Abdul Razak as the second Prime Minister in September 1970.
It has accurately predicted four prime ministers after the first Prime Minister, Tunku Abdul Rahman.

 

 

 

 

 

THE INEVITABLE DISSOLUTION OF A CORRUPT AND EVIL REGIME... (REPRISE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr M: Reject BN and opposition will destroy country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RISING BN VIOLENCE towards the Opposition: Surendran & Kian Ming latest victims

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mother of All Battles - GE13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Anwar Sure of Pakatan Win, Warns GE-13 His Final Bid: Let New Generation Take Over

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahathir, a racist Malay chauvinist - TRUE OR FALSE?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidents, Prime Ministers and Justices et.al are not above the Law

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Corruption blocking Malaysia’s leap into higher-income status, says Nazir Razak

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr M & the Sabah RCI: 'Mother of all gambles' that Najib has already LOST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Mother of All Battles - GE13

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Diving exports bad news for Najib

 

Analysts said sluggish performance could be a major blow to Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak’s aim to win big in what would be the ruling coalition’s toughest elections yet.

Political pundits said Najib should call for elections now while Malaysia could still weather the global economic storm but his announcement that the 2013 Budget would be tabled this September meant that the national polls could be held only after.

A delay could be detrimental to Barisan Nasional’s election chances, observers said.

Najib’s approval rating had already slipped by 5% in a May poll compared to 69% in March and the premier was expected to use next year’s Budget to tackle the setback.

 

 

A June or July poll had been the favourite, but Najib appears to have calculated that he needs more time - and more handouts - to maximise chances of regaining the two-thirds parliamentary majority that the government lost in 2008.
"The window for October elections is wide open now. This is the next window after July," said one senior government source who declined to be identified.
"This is a risky election and the prime minister does not want to take any chances. He has to prove to the people that the government will be there for them. So he has to balance his reforms with social economic help," he said.
Another government source said one of the suggested dates for the election was Oct. 14, just two weeks after Najib, who is also finance minister, presents the 2013 budget in parliament.
The decision to delay the election carries risks. A worsening global downturn could impact the trade-dependent economy in the coming months, dampening the feel-good factor generated by handouts.

 

 

Diving exports bad news for Najib

 

 

 

 

 

 

The back-lash viscious tailspin 'boomerang effect' Contagion of the Euro debt crisis, US recession & the slowdown of China, will very likely hit the Malaysian shores by early 2013 January!



http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-back-lash-viscious-tailspin.html








Desperado-Last Premier from Umno-BN Najib will do a last minute Santa Claus stint dishing out goodies during his Budget speech on 28th September 2012 and after which the announcement for the Polling Day will be proclaimed to be on most likely (the date predicted) Sunday 14th October! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is the Key deciding factors in GE-13 timing?

Bersih 3.0 vs Umno 66th anniversary: Key deciding factors in GE-13 timing?
Malaysia Chronicle
Bersih 3.0 vs Umno 66th anniversary
It looks like Prime Minister Najib Razak has decided to come down hard on the Bersih 3.0 rally, as he did to last year’s Bersih 2.0. Again, it is a bid to show his grip on the nation but this time, the stakes are higher with his Umno party’s 66th anniversary celebration due to begin from May 1 to May 13.
Already, thugs accused of being linked to Umno have begun the scare-mongering by beating student protesters, not sparing even the girls with their roughness. This was followed up by the Kuala Lumpur City Hall refusing to grant Bersih 3.0 approval for its April 28 rally at the Dataran Merdeka.
And as expected, the police stood by and watched, doing the minimal to stop the ruffians although the Inspector General of Police has threatened to come down hard on those who broke the law. IGP Ismail Omar’s message, it appears, is meant only for those who do not support Umno-BN.
A historic stopping of the clock at Parliament to ram through 8 bills has also stirred worry. What is happening, are there hidden clauses that the BN wants to push through to further strengthen its hand ahead of the 13th general election? Maybe. It might also be that BN wants to clear as much of its in-tray as possible before dissolving Parliament.
The ‘dates’ are out
The rush to push through the bills led to speculation that Najib might dissolve Parliament on April 23, but with the Dewan Negara due to sit until May 10 to ratify the bills, or these will have to be gazetted again, that rumor has now been safely debunked.
Yet pundits are betting that Parliament will be dissolved anytime between May 16 to May 23 and balloting to take place between June 9 to June 18.
This despite the recent swirl of negative publicity hitting several top Umno leaders, with Rural minister Shafie Apdal the latest to get into hot soup over a sex scandal and Najib himself put on a French court’s witness list in the Scorpenes acquisition corruption trial.
Adding to Najib’s woes is a master-stroke by Opposition Leader Anwar Ibrahim, who earlier this week riled Umno when he announced that Selangor will not be holding concurrent polls with the BN in GE-13. Not until an audit of the electoral roll is carried out.
“I think Najib is committed to a mid June date. For Selangor, the electoral roll is so badly tampered with they would be crazy to play to Umno’s tune. One way or another, they will insist on a clean up,” PKR vice president Tian Chua told Malaysia Chronicle.
“Of course, this will take wind out of Najib’s sails. Even if he wins GE-13, without Selangor in the bag, he is at risk of being toppled at the Umno internal election. As for Penang, Kedah and Kelantan, the respective chief ministers have not decided yet. They may or may not join Selangor.”
Room to change his mind
One of the reasons cited for Najib’s urgency to hold snap polls has been that the Umno-led government was running short of funds after distributing a recent slew of cash aids to gain favour with voters in GE-13.
Another oft-cited reason is that Najib must ‘somehow’ hold GE-13 before the Umno internal polls – which must be held by October. That basis for that is that the party warlords (i.e. the division and branch leaders) want to get their hands on the allocations reserved for operating the election machinery. If they waited after the Umno elections, they may get booted out and this loss of largesse would spur them into sabotaging the BN’s chances in GE-13.
Yet taking all into consideration, Najib has room to change his mind.
The government can still raise local bonds to stay afloat, bankruptcy is not yet at the door although it is not far. In fact, GE-13 is probably not only the most dirty election ever but it will probably cost the most. Some say thousands of billions are stake and they are referring to control of the government’s huge stakes in GLCs such as Telekom and Tenaga.
According to some pundits, this is why Najib has been promising the moon and the sky to some of the most wealthy investors including former prime minister Mahathir Mohamad and former finance minister Daim Zainuddin. Najib needs to assure them that their interests will be protected and for their monopoly on the country’s wealth to continue, Najib has to pursue right-wing Malay-supremacy policies. Otherwise, he would not be able to maintain the existing snatch-and-grab socio-economic system painstakingly built by Mahathir during his 22-years in power.
As for internal sabotage, it does not really matter. For example, Najib can choose to hold GE-13 in November or even in 2013. By then, those who lost in the Umno polls would already be forgotten entities, or harmless at any rate. What Najib must ensure is that he has the loyalty of those who win in the Umno polls, which is where his list of ‘winnable’ candidates kicks in. With the power to have the last say on who to field in GE-13, Najib can easily make certain that those who win office in the Umno polls will be ‘his men’.
The big 66
What may be driving the pundits’ and the Pakatan’s belief that GE-13 will be held in June is the extraordinary scale of the Umno’s 66th anniversary celebrations. On May 11, he has called on 1 million Umno members to show themselves at a grand function to be held in the Bukit Jalil stadium. Such costly mobilization and the willingness to spend on the event is certainly not a clue to be ignored.
Whether or not Najib announces his decision to dissolve Parliament on that May 11 night really depends on 2 events. One is of course the crowd size in the Bukit Jalil stadium itself. Will 1 million Umno members come and heed his call for a show of support? Given the freebies involved, the answer is likely.
The other event will be the April 28 Bersih 3.0 rally. Will it take off as the organizers have planned. Bersih has announced a total nationwide target crowd-size of 500,000. Pundits are saying, if even 100,000 turn up, then Najib will be shifting his GE-13 target date to September, and from there, he may even shift it further to 2013.
Only a fool …
To be frank, all the analysis and number crunching may seem convincing. But really, it would be a fool who would believe, and it has to be a moron who would need such elephantine preparations just to make a decision.
Numbers are only meaningful if obtained neutrally. Ask any researcher. With the police already coming down harder each day on Bersih and driving away participants, Najib might succeed in showing Umno that he is still the most popular man in Malaysia. And with all the free transport, lodging, ‘makan’, door gifts and possibly cash allowances, it would be a slap in the face if Najib failed to get the 1 million Umno members into Bukit Jalil.
But so what? Aren’t these numbers ‘faked’, so to speak. Why should he expect the same trend at the ballot boxes? For example, without the same source of financial support, the Umno-backed Himpun anti-apostasy rally for 1 million Muslims drew only 3,000 to 5,000 supporters. Also without the same finances and amid harsh police control, 50,000 Malaysians still managed to suddenly crop up in the heart of Kuala Lumpur to take part in the July 9 Bersih 2.0 rally.
So, like surveys, numbers are deceptive. Najib might be a vain and foolish leader. But perhaps, he is also banking on this sleight of hand or imagery – that he can command 1 million and Bersih 3.0 only tens of thousands  – to win GE-13.
Current state of support
It is a psy-war but does psychology really work? Only Malaysians can give the answer on the day of the balloting.
For now, the sentiment amongst the Chinese is clear. Come what may, they will stick with Pakatan in GE-13. For the Indians, it is less obvious. In Sabah and Sarawak, the winds of change may be blowing but again, it is hard to gauge if the desire for reform can outstrip the greed for cash that will surely be offered in exchange for their votes.
And lastly, for the Malays – the largest electorate group – how will they vote this time? Will they buy Najib’s imagery of strength, will they succumb to the false calls for unity and their own selfishness for supremacy against the other races?
Or will they plumb for fresh air, space and the chance to narrow the wealth gap with the Umnoputras (the select percentile who have benefited from Umno’s corrupt rule such as the party bigwigs and their cronies)?
It’s still the Malay vote that is undecided
The Malay and the Chinese psyche are quite different. The Chinese tend to be more clear-minded and less emotional. They can and will see through Najib’s 1 million Malays ‘David Copperfield’ illusion. Yet, they are capable of biting back their disgust and voting for the BN – which they did until 2008. However, in 2012 or even 2013, the Chinese can still be counted on to roll the dice once more for the Pakatan because they know this is the best ever opportunity to break the BN’s stranglehold.
The Malays are more emotional. A successful 1 million Malays rally will bring a tear to many eyes. Yet by being emotional, the righteousness inherent in the Malay makeup may spur them to reject the out-of-control corruption and madness that is necessarily part and parcel of Umno rule.
Umno is owned by vested interest and to keep these interests in power, the only way is to continue on a path that is illogical, a path of racism, religious bigotry and backwardness totally out of sync with the rest of the world. The Malays know it. The thing is, will they still give Umno one more chance. It’s much like giving an addict another shot of heroin just because you feel sorry for him. But should you?


























Diving exports bad news for Najib

 

Analysts said sluggish performance could be a major blow to Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak’s aim to win big in what would be the ruling coalition’s toughest elections yet.

Political pundits said Najib should call for elections now while Malaysia could still weather the global economic storm but his announcement that the 2013 Budget would be tabled this September meant that the national polls could be held only after.

A delay could be detrimental to Barisan Nasional’s election chances, observers said.

Najib’s approval rating had already slipped by 5% in a May poll compared to 69% in March and the premier was expected to use next year’s Budget to tackle the setback.

 

 

A June or July poll had been the favourite, but Najib appears to have calculated that he needs more time - and more handouts - to maximise chances of regaining the two-thirds parliamentary majority that the government lost in 2008.
"The window for October elections is wide open now. This is the next window after July," said one senior government source who declined to be identified.
"This is a risky election and the prime minister does not want to take any chances. He has to prove to the people that the government will be there for them. So he has to balance his reforms with social economic help," he said.
Another government source said one of the suggested dates for the election was Oct. 14, just two weeks after Najib, who is also finance minister, presents the 2013 budget in parliament.
The decision to delay the election carries risks. A worsening global downturn could impact the trade-dependent economy in the coming months, dampening the feel-good factor generated by handouts.

 

 

Diving exports bad news for Najib













The back-lash viscious tailspin 'boomerang effect' Contagion of the Euro debt crisis, US recession & the slowdown of China, will very likely hit the Malaysian shores by early 2013 January!



http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-back-lash-viscious-tailspin.html








Desperado-Last Premier from Umno-BN Najib will do a last minute Santa Claus stint dishing out goodies during his Budget speech on 28th September 2012 and after which the announcement for the Polling Day will be proclaimed to be on most likely (the date predicted) Sunday 14th October!































When Malaysia General Election GE13 To Be Held?


The Malaysia General Election (GE 13) analysis and prediction below is by MIDF research:
Table below shows the election dates of all of the past general elections (GE) since 1959. At first glance it reveals that no particular favored month for a GE to be held but does suggest that a weekend is preferred, possibly to minimize the disruption to the working population.
Election date and day from past elections and parliament duration:
malaysia election ge13
•     Only two parliament editions ran full 5-year mandate.On average, the Malaysian parliament ran for 52.96 months or 4 years, 4 months and 29 days. Applying the average duration, theoretically the 13th GE should be held on Monday, 6 August 2012. Revised to 4 or 5 August 2012 to exclude working days. However, we believe the date is unlikely given past three elections was held during school holidays.
In addition, Budget 2013 is likely to be tabled in September and it falls during Ramadhan month.
•     Other limiting factors. Besides school holidays and Ramadhan, there are several other limiting factors which need to be considered, namely date of school examinations and Haj season. Following the aforementioned logic, the next possible date will be in November and December 2012. We understand that the Sijil Pernilaian Malaysia (SPM) starts on 5 November 2012 to 6 December 2012. Hence, it is possible that the elections could be held in second or third week of December 2012.

























Diving exports bad news for Najib

 

Analysts said sluggish performance could be a major blow to Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak’s aim to win big in what would be the ruling coalition’s toughest elections yet.

Political pundits said Najib should call for elections now while Malaysia could still weather the global economic storm but his announcement that the 2013 Budget would be tabled this September meant that the national polls could be held only after.

A delay could be detrimental to Barisan Nasional’s election chances, observers said.

Najib’s approval rating had already slipped by 5% in a May poll compared to 69% in March and the premier was expected to use next year’s Budget to tackle the setback.

 

 

A June or July poll had been the favourite, but Najib appears to have calculated that he needs more time - and more handouts - to maximise chances of regaining the two-thirds parliamentary majority that the government lost in 2008.
"The window for October elections is wide open now. This is the next window after July," said one senior government source who declined to be identified.
"This is a risky election and the prime minister does not want to take any chances. He has to prove to the people that the government will be there for them. So he has to balance his reforms with social economic help," he said.
Another government source said one of the suggested dates for the election was Oct. 14, just two weeks after Najib, who is also finance minister, presents the 2013 budget in parliament.
The decision to delay the election carries risks. A worsening global downturn could impact the trade-dependent economy in the coming months, dampening the feel-good factor generated by handouts.

 

 

Diving exports bad news for Najib















The back-lash viscious tailspin 'boomerang effect' Contagion of the Euro debt crisis, US recession & the slowdown of China, will very likely hit the Malaysian shores by early 2013 January!



http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-back-lash-viscious-tailspin.html








Desperado-Last Premier from Umno-BN Najib will do a last minute Santa Claus stint dishing out goodies during his Budget speech on 28th September 2012 and after which the announcement for the Polling Day will be proclaimed to be on most likely (the date predicted) Sunday 14th October!




























Speculation of GE13 date gathers steam

KUALA LUMPUR - The date when the 13th general election will be held continues to be the main talking point among Malaysians. When will parliament be dissolved to make way for general election continues to be speculated on by many quarters.

Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak recently made an official visit to Sabah and held a closed meeting with Sabah BN leaders.  
A BN leader told reporters later that Najib reminded that the general election is close.   The statement is just a reminder to BN component parties in Sabah to be ready for general election at any time.
 Determining the date is the right of the prime minister who advises the Yang di-Pertuan Agong to dissolve parliament, prompting the Election Commission (EC)to determine the dates for nomination and polling.
 Political observers said several factors indicate that dissolution of parliament may be in May or June, with general election held within 60 days.
The first factor is Najib's cancellation of the Public Service New Remuneration Scheme (SBPA) and adoption of an improved Malaysian Remuneration Scheme (SSM).  
Resolving the issue is very important as it involves 1.4mil civil servantswho implement transformation policies and improvements for the people andgovernment.
With the decision well received by civil servants, there is no reason forthem not to continue supporting the BN government which has looked after the welfare of their children and ensure a brighter future.
The second factor is that Najib and his deputy Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin havebeen on nationwide tours every weekend to meet the people, as promised at a press conference after Umno General Assembly 2010.
 Umno information chief Datuk Ahmad Maslan sounded the war drum by asking BN's election machinery, particularly Umno, to get into fifth gear as general election is close.    He was quoted as saying that general election rarely exceeds four years and therefore, election is at most five months away.  
The third factor is the Umno assembly which has been deferred 18 months to Sept 2013. The last aassembly held in March 2009 was to consolide and avoid tussle for posts to focus on general election.
The fourth factor which points towards May or June is Malaysia's economy which is poised to continue its progress in 2012, as stated by Oxford Business Group (OBG), a global publishing, intelligence research and consulting firm.   - Bernama

























Diving exports bad news for Najib

 

Analysts said sluggish performance could be a major blow to Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak’s aim to win big in what would be the ruling coalition’s toughest elections yet.

Political pundits said Najib should call for elections now while Malaysia could still weather the global economic storm but his announcement that the 2013 Budget would be tabled this September meant that the national polls could be held only after.

A delay could be detrimental to Barisan Nasional’s election chances, observers said.

Najib’s approval rating had already slipped by 5% in a May poll compared to 69% in March and the premier was expected to use next year’s Budget to tackle the setback.

 

 

A June or July poll had been the favourite, but Najib appears to have calculated that he needs more time - and more handouts - to maximise chances of regaining the two-thirds parliamentary majority that the government lost in 2008.
"The window for October elections is wide open now. This is the next window after July," said one senior government source who declined to be identified.
"This is a risky election and the prime minister does not want to take any chances. He has to prove to the people that the government will be there for them. So he has to balance his reforms with social economic help," he said.
Another government source said one of the suggested dates for the election was Oct. 14, just two weeks after Najib, who is also finance minister, presents the 2013 budget in parliament.
The decision to delay the election carries risks. A worsening global downturn could impact the trade-dependent economy in the coming months, dampening the feel-good factor generated by handouts.

 

 

Diving exports bad news for Najib













The back-lash viscious tailspin 'boomerang effect' Contagion of the Euro debt crisis, US recession & the slowdown of China, will very likely hit the Malaysian shores by early 2013 January!



http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2012/08/the-back-lash-viscious-tailspin.html








Desperado-Last Premier from Umno-BN Najib will do a last minute Santa Claus stint dishing out goodies during his Budget speech on 28th September 2012 and after which the announcement for the Polling Day will be proclaimed to be on most likely (the date predicted) Sunday 14th October!




























Sept GE-13 looking likely: Najib announces civil servant bonus, to be paid by Aug 9


Civil servants will be given a half-month bonus while government pensioners will receive a special RM500 payout next month, Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today, amid expectations that elections will be held as soon as September.
The bonus for civil servants and special payment for government pensioners will cost taxpayers an estimated RM2.2 billion.
The prime minister said in a statement today that civil servants would be guaranteed a bonus of at least RM500.
There are 1.27 million civil servants and 657,000 government pensioners. They are considered an important group of voters and their support is seen as crucial to an election victory for Najib’s Barisan Nasional (BN) coalition.
Najib said the bonus payments would be made by August 9, about 10 days before Hari Raya Aidilfitri.
The prime minister said the bonus payments were being made based on the federal government’s strong financial position.
He added that it was a token of appreciation by the government to civil servants and government pensioners.
Sept polls looking likely
It was reported last week that the Najib administration is looking at a snap election in September before Malaysia Day if it goes through with a plan to dissolve parliament next month.
It is understood that Najib’s aides and BN officials have briefed a number of people on the plan to hold elections between Hari Raya Aidifitri, which falls on August 19, and the proposed Budget Day of September 28. Malaysia Day is on September 16.
Najib has been cagey about the election date although he expressed confidence in winning all state governments and the federal government. His BN controls Putrajaya and nine states while the opposition Pakatan Rakyat (PR) rules Kedah, Kelantan, Penang and Selangor. PR lost Perak in February 2009 when three lawmakers turned independent, which was enough for BN to capture the state.
Last week, Cuepacs and a newly-launched government pensioners club pledged their “undivided” support to Najib and the BN administration for the coming elections.
Critics from the federal opposition have often condemned government leaders for allegedly abusing the country’s civil service, long viewed as a key vote bank for the ruling BN pact.
Top government officials have also gone on an apparent overdrive to protect the BN government they serve.
Newly-appointed Chief Secretary to the Government Datuk Seri Ali Hamsa had recently raised eyebrows when he told his new charges that they “should know better” than to believe the “empty promises” made by the opposition.
Najib, who is seeking his first mandate at the polls, has been touring the country with his Jelajah Janji Ditepati (Promises Fulfilled Tour) over the past few months and is due to visit Kelantan and Terengganu soon for the campaign. Ironically or coincidentally, Janji Ditepati (Promises Fulfilled) is also the theme for this year’s National Day on August 31.
Nearly 13 million voters are eligible to cast their ballot if a general election is called involving all 222 federal seats and 505 seats in 12 states. However, the four PR-ruled states have yet to say if they will hold elections on the same day as the general election because their mandates only expire next April. Sarawak held its state election last year.

























KUALA LUMPUR, — The Haj pilgrimage on October 26 and Barisan Nasional’s (BN) efforts to court the youth and Chinese vote could delay the general election to November, sources say, adding Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak is still scrutinising the candidates’ lists to ensure a bigger victory.
The Malaysian Insider had reported on May 28 of a possible September general election but Najib’s announcement that Budget 2013 will be tabled on September 28 has pushed party strategists to look at a further date to also ensure budget goodies get to the ground.
“The Haj could delay the vote just as much as BN wants the people to enjoy the benefits of Budget 2013. We’re looking at November now,” a source told The Malaysian Insider.
Election Commission (EC) sources say the commission is ready for polls but has yet to get any indication of snap polls for the 222 federal seats and 505 state seats, except the Sarawak state assembly which was elected last year.
“The window is narrowing for polls in July as the Ramadan fasting month starts late that month, followed by celebrations for Hari Raya Aidil Fitri after that. It looks like it will go beyond Budget Day and the Haj,” one EC source said.
Officials familiar with BN strategies say Najib wants the ruling coalition to win back urban seats lost when the mainly urban Chinese voted in favour of the opposition in Election 2008.
“Najib wants support from the Chinese and the youth, so the next few months will be crucial for those efforts,” a coalition source told The Malaysian Insider.
He pointed out that the BN chairman is due to attend the TwtupKami gathering in Bukit Jalil this Saturday, where thousands of youths on the Twitter social media network are expected to turn up for a day of fun and games. The organisers have already invited Najib to play the ukelele at the event, which is said to have been organised with the help of the ruling coalition.
“The TwtupKami is similar to the Suara Kami concert last year where the PM also turned up. He is working hard to get the youth vote,” the source added.
Najib’s recent promotion of Gerakan secretary-general Teng Chang Yeow as the Penang BN chief is also seen as part of efforts to push up more Chinese leaders to attract support from the economically-powerfully community that forms some 23 per cent of the population.
The prime minister’s approval rating from the Chinese and Indian communities has slipped after the April 28 Bersih 3.0 rally, said pollster Merdeka Center but its latest survey showed Najib’s rating is 65 per cent, a drop of four percentage points from an earlier survey. Former Prime Minister Tun Abdullah Ahmad Badawi’s approval rating was 71 per cent when he called snap polls in March 2008.
BN coalition sources say several recent surveys show BN needs to work harder to get a convincing victory especially with some 2.2 million voters casting ballots for the first time. The next general election is only due after April 2013 when BN’s mandate expires.
It is understood the compilation of surveys revealed that BN could win up to 146 parliamentary seats with at least 80 sure wins, more than the 140 won in Election 2008.
The source said the surveys will be done in June and BN strategists would compile and assess the results during the Ramadan and Syawal months.
Sources had told The Malaysian Insider that a July election was a possibility as election materials had been imported and were in warehouses waiting to be distributed. Several Umno divisions have also begun putting up flags in the capital city and across the country, prompting speculation of snap polls. The coalition controls 138 out of the 222 seats in the Dewan Rakyat and all states except four, ruled by rival Pakatan Rakyat (PR).
The Najib administration has focused on various demographics but a proposal to abolish a federal education fund by PR could cause support to sway among the youth, a key component in the electorate and comprising at least 20 per cent of the 12 million-strong electoral list. Nearly 60 per cent of the new voters are Malays, the dominant community in the country.
The Bersih 3.0 rally asking for the electoral list to be cleaned up has also cut some support for the government as nearly 200,000 people had a sit-in in Kuala Lumpur together with thousands others in cities and towns across Malaysia and the world.
Najib had on May 4 brushed off speculation that the polls may be delayed following the Bersih 3.0 fracas, saying the date would be decided based on how the people view the government. “The date of the election is not contingent upon all this,” he said then.
“Well, it’s up to the public to decide. We will decide on the basis of how the people view the government, you see,” Najib added.
Bersih, a coalition of 84 groups, has disputed the EC electoral rolls and has called for a clean and fair election during its three rallies from 2007, the last being on April 28 where tens of thousands turned up for a peaceful sit-in. It was marred by violence when several protestors breached barricades around Dataran Merdeka which the authorities closed down to prevent the sit-in.
The Najib administration responded after Bersih 2.0 last July with the formation of a parliamentary select committee (PSC) that made 22 recommendations but Bersih still insists the electoral rolls are not cleaned up.


































Fasting month the best time for GE-13?


Fasting month the best time for GE-13?
ELECTION DATE- Fed by people claiming to be in the know, everyone is playing the guessing game
THESE days, the election date guessing game peppers almost all conversations. We have after all been in an election anticipation mode for the past couple of years, fed by punditries and analyses by people claiming to be in the know.
For some, the drums of elections were beaten the day after the 2008 polls, and it has been endless, incessant drumming since, much to the detriment of the nation's collective sanity, I believe.
So-called political analysts claiming inside knowledge, insight and the ability to cut through the political noises and read the nuances of politicos' speak, have put words to paper that the election would have been in the first quarter, then the first half, of the year.
They are probably the same folks who predicted the same for last year, moving the polling date from month to month, and quarter to quarter, till last year ended. The lesson here is of course whoever claims to know something probably possesses the same insight as the person beside you at the mamak restaurant.
But the great thing about punditry is one need not be right, just be convincing.
Nevertheless, I wish I had a ringgit for every time someone asked me when the election was going to be held. I may be in the media business, but I do not possess the ability to read people's minds, much less the prime minister's.
Fret not, sooner or later they will get it right. A few weeks ago, I met one senior elections official who said -- cheekily -- the elections was "getting closer now", which of course was true but provided me no clearer picture of the polls ahead.
Politicians are playing the guessing game, too. The federal opposition is of course the most active. They have been preparing for a general election since striking it hot in 2008, and have been the most vocal advocate of earlier elections, complaining, whining and even daring the Federal Government to hold one early.
Ironically, this desire for an early election is only for parliamentary seats, and not for state assemblies for they would want to stretch their hold on Penang, Selangor, Kedah and Kelantan, for as long as possible. Hah!
The soothsaying for the election dates was also the impetus for the Bersih 2.0 and Bersih 3.0 rallies. They were held with the idea that election was coming, the former when it was speculated that election was to be last year, and the latter when the organisers were betting that it would be now.
Now, the date is said to be coming in between a Muslim and his haj pilgrimage, with Pas suggesting that its supporters defer the act of completing one of the pillars of Islamic faith for worldly politics.
It is of course par for the political course to insinuate the prime minister's nefarious scheme to call for elections during the haj season -- when he has not done so -- to deny the opposition their votes.
However, one then needs to ask what impact will 30,000 plus absent Muslims voters from all over the country have on the results of 222 parliamentary seats and 505 state assembly seats (minus Sarawak, of course).
Furthermore, are all haj pilgrims Pas supporters, or living in Kelantan?
I would think that more Malaysians would not be at the polls if elections were held at the end of the year, since tens of thousand of Malaysians travel, domestic or international, during the year end school holidays.
For my two sen worth of punditry, I would like to suggest that the elections be held soon during the fasting month. When fasting, a Muslim is sort of in a state of grace, minding his speech, behaviour, actions and thoughts. For the believers, doing good during the month will see reward many times over in the after life.
Of course the non-Muslims can continue with politics as usual, campaigning as vigorously, and perhaps as viciously.
But for the Muslims who are nearly two-thirds of the population, a decidedly muted campaign period -- minus the lies, slander and name calling -- would undoubtedly greatly lower the nation's political temperature. That would be nice, wouldn't it?
























Delaying GE-13: Who says we're not confident, support for BN overwhelming - Najib



Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak said there was no question of lack of confidence on the part of the Barisan Nasional (BN) as claimed by the opposition that he deliberately delayed the general election date.

The prime minister said the BN was given the mandate by the people for five years to show its ability to lead and govern the country, bring progress and champion the people.

"If we call for a snap elections, it means that we have shortened the period given to us by the people.

"So the question of not confident does not arise. For us, what is important is to show our ability to continue to champion the people," he told reporters after chairing the BN Supreme Council meeting at the Putra World Trade Centre here, Friday night.

Najib, who is also Umno president and BN chairman, pointed out that the people had shown good response to transformation programmes implemented by the government.

This can be seen from his and his deputy, Tan Sri Muhyiddin Yassin's visits to the states, he said, adding that the support of the people was overwhelming and reflected growing confidence in the BN.

"We cannot be haughty, but our confidence level is based on the people's reception to our visits and the 1Malaysia-themed programmes," he said.

Citing the Government Transformation Programme and the Economic Transformation Programme, he said: "We had delivered them which means (our confidence) is not without any particular assessment."

Najib also said the programme hinged on engagement with various community groups such as the People's 1Malaysia Taxi programme (TR1MA).

In the meantime, he reminded the BN not to raise issues that might hurt the feelings of any race or pose a problem among BN component parties.

Commenting the opposition's allegation that he had interfered in the Light Rail Transit's Ampang Line, he said, "Everything is done properly. There's no such thing."


































Next Malaysian general election

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The 13th Malaysian general election must be held by 27 June 2013 at the very latest. The constitutional parliamentary term in Malaysia is five years, after which the parliament must be dissolved by the Yang di-Pertuan Agong on the advice of the Prime Minister as pertained in the Malaysian laws for national elections. Malaysia uses the first-past-the-post system. The election will be conducted by the Election Commission of Malaysia. While in theory any State may dissolve its assembly independently of the Federal Parliament, the traditional practice is for most state assemblies to be dissolved at the same time as Parliament, with the exception of Sarawak.



























13th GE in September?

Selena Tay | August 15, 2012
September is the only avenue opened for Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak to call for the polls, the first under his leadership.
COMMENT
The month of September will be upon us in a little more than two weeks time. Some political observers are already discussing whether the 13th general election will be held in September and some of them have opined that September is still a possibility in order to catch Pakatan Rakyat by surprise.
Actually, September is the only avenue opened for Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak to call for the polls. In the field of detective work, it has been said that when all the possibilities have been eliminated, then that which remains is the one that clinches it.
Appended below is a month-by-month analysis right up to June next year:
1. October 2012 – the haj season is going on and if the general election is to be held this month, PAS will have enough reasons to shoot Umno down and the image of Najib as a Muslim leader will be torn to shreds.
2. November 2012 – the SPM and STPM exams are being held and school halls will be used.
3. December 2012 – end of the year brings floods to Kedah and Kelantan and the PAS state government in these two states will probably not dissolve the State Legislative Assemblies. This means that these two states will still be in PAS’ hands after the polls in December if it is to be held in December.
4. January 2013 – floods too and also the beginning of the school season and teachers will be busy. (Teachers are also required to participate in BN’s campaign rounds.)
5. February 2013 – Chinese New Year. It will not be feasible to anger the Chinese in this manner.
6. March 2013 – too close to full term which ends on April 28. The rakyat will be able to see clearly that the prime minister is not a confident man.
7. April 2013 – full term. Everyone will be able to see that Najib is cowardly and inefficient and is at last cornered and forced to hold the polls.
8. May to June 2013 – two months’ extension of time from April 28. Ditto as in April: cowardly and inefficient.
As such, whether Najib likes it or not, he has to call for the polls before Sept 17 before the haj season begins.
RCI on illegals
Having the polls in September will also prevent more Barisan Nasional lawmakers from quitting. Meanwhile, Najib has set up a Royal Commission of Inquiry to look into the problem of the illegals in Sabah getting MyKad, which has only now merited his attention.
Be that as it may, the prime minister is not really looking into the real problems that the nation is facing. Has Malaysia taken concrete steps to reinforce the economy before we are hit by the global economic downturn?
What is the federal government doing to curb crime and reduce the number of illegals landing on our shores? Seems that Malaysia is on autopilot.
Instead, the prime minister is busy mulling over when to call for the polls. Already there was a major failed attempt in June this year. It is called a “failed attempt” because in May he was telling those who attended the Umno 66th anniversary celebrations that he is thinking of seeking a royal audience in order to dissolve Parliament. But nothing came out of that.
Najib should get the gold medal in terms of being the world’s most indecisive leader.
Playing it safe
The BN government must get the country up and running by concentrating on economic and administrative matters and this can only be done after the polls are held as clearer policies can then be formulated.
Now everything is held up while our nearest neighbour Singapore is forging ahead in terms of investments.
The prime minister can still hold the election not later than Sept 17 by dissolving Parliament by Aug 27 the latest. A long-time political observer, who wished to remain anonymous, opined that Najib is the sort of person who likes to play safe in the sense that he will not call for the polls unless he is absolutely sure that he can win big and BN is absolutely ready for the polls.
“There is no such thing as 100% readiness although the prime minister seems unable to realise this,” said M Manogaran, DAP’s Teluk Intan MP.
In the recently-concluded London Olympics, a Russian diver and an American diver broke the Chinese stranglehold on the diving event because they had the guts to perform difficult dives when it mattered.
That is the hallmark of a champion and this is the quality that is sorely lacking in Najib. He does not have the courage and the conviction to go for the jugular.
“At the end of the day, Najib’s leadership qualities are in doubt as he does not have a clear mindset of where he is heading and in which direction he is leading the nation,” said PAS Kuala Selangor MP, Dzulkefly Ahmad.
Therefore in the 13th general election, Malaysians must decide whether to stick to the old and familiar BN and remain stagnant with a clueless leadership or be brave enough to go for change in order to improve and forge ahead to be a major player on the world economic stage.
By the way, this columnist is adamant that the polls will be held in September unless the prime minister wants to prove this columnist wrong.
Selena Tay is a FMT columnist.




























Wednesday, 15 August 2012 11:47

Wavering GE-13 date: Malaysia, now vulnerable to self-created instability

Written by  Map Reader
Indeed the 13th General Election has qualified as the mother of all general elections. And it is no accident hence making the country most vulnerable.
It is an election whose date is the most speculated and highly kept under wraps.
It is a battle deadline that is unprecedented in the history of independent Malaysia - an agenda that is fiercely fought even before the people go to the polls to decide who should be given the mandate to form the next government.
Gutter politicking the worst ever
Never before have Malaysians being subjected to stooping so low to discredit the political opponents. Ranging from alleged and proven corruption to sleaze, sex, race discrimination to religious threats – the run up to the GE13 is by comparison the worst ever in the history of this nation that once many looked upon as the promising Tiger of Asia.
Millions of foreign workers will vouch that Malaysia is a land of milk and honey as they cart away billions of cash back to their homelands to give hope to their families over abject poverty and grueling hardships.
While this post-colonial post-independence raid of the national larder is championed and nurtured by the powers that be in modern times, Malaysians meanwhile have been put on the dole with cash handouts as temporary relief and caring incentives in the run-up to the 13th GE.
Such scenarios were never there in the past five over decades.
Just take a quick inventory of all the unending episodes drummed up by politicians almost on a daily ration these past years: you-sue-me, I-sue-you; you-expose-me, I-expose-you-even-more; cow-heads marches to anger Hindus; pig-ears near mosques; Christian proselytization allegations; unsolved high profile murders; claims of treason; accusations of republic nation status inclinations – in fact the list is unending really.
The question is why? Why are we witnessing a battle preparation that very much sounds like a ‘over our crushed bones and dead bodies’ strategy?
Crushed bones & dead bodies: Refusal to move onto new political system
The easy answer is that politicians are not willing, nor prepared to let the rakyat decide in a democratic manner who they want to vote in as the next political party to form the government. The strategy is an ‘at all costs we must win’. The end in itself justifies all and any means taken – even if those means are crude, unjust, ridiculous, scandalous and merciless.
The question then to go on asking is not why but how come. How come we have arrived at this stage in our political nationhood despite the five over decades of political, social, economic and environmental progress and development that is often the staple, stated claim of the BN-led government (Janji Detepati)?
It certainly has nothing to do with the drummed-up sacking of DSAI. It is not confined to mismanagement nor mere corruption. It is not even about a silent DAP-agenda, nor a PAS-hudud plan.
It is about a failed political system. And the very architect of that diabolic, one-track minded power-consolidation politics is today still fighting with his vintage life to keep a wrong right.
But civilization is dynamic
What worked well for a post-independent nation was not allowed to evolve over the times. We were subjected to a non-negotiable road map cast in concrete with a tunneled view. We were subjected to wear blinkers shielding us from the global transformations taking place quietly.
Drawing on the antiquated formulas of race and religion, the political architecture being locked-in for Malaysia was myopic. As long as it served the political masters well, the scavengers and parasites quickly aligned themselves to provide the much needed fencing and barricades that would ensure permanency to the political agendas of a cartel of single individuals.
But little did the politicians realize that civilization is dynamic. The world is evolving. The transformations are moving on. Humanity was changing in its philosophy, understanding and aspirations. What worked for the post-industrial world was not the panacea for the New Age that was being shaped by information communication technology. Humanity was re-discovering that new independence that the emerging networked society offered.
Unfortunately in Malaysia, politicians are frozen dead in their mindsets. Their attitudes do not in any way reflect the renaissance of humanity sweeping across the planet. They are merely bent in going to battle like the Genghis Khans of bygone eras.
No one is indispensable
Politicians step back. Stop. Think. Reflect.
You are not going to win this ‘war’ by fighting to keep your spoils. You will only see yourself eventually being overwhelmed and swept off by your forced-upon winnings. Remember Suharto? Marcos? Mao?
If you love the country – as much as you preach you do; if you uphold loyalty to King, citizens and nation, then step back and stick to honesty.
If you have delivered, you do not have to spin to convince the voters. If you have failed in the past you do not have to threaten of mayhem and chaos.
Nobody in the world, no one leader in any nation and no single political party in Malaysia is indispensable. There are no absolutes and this the BN must know fast.
The political architecture of thirty over years is failing and incapable of meeting the challenges, requirements and dictates of the New Age humanity. That is the reason why we are today witnessing a perilous future as we witness the hardened battle cries of stubborn, selfish, self-conceited politicians.
We need leadership to overcome the quagmire situation that threatens the nation’s future. It is about a leadership that reflects the very essence of the New Age humanity in Malaysia – one that sees beyond race, religion, color, creed, ability and privileges. And any attempts to kill off that leadership for the sake of party supremacy will spell chaos.
Malaysia Chronicle

























 Friday, 03 August 2012 23:38

"I DON'T KNOW WHEN" - Until now, Najib still HAZY over GE-13 date


KUALA LUMPUR - The latest departures of two Sabah Barisan Nasional (BN) lawmakers will not affect the date of the coming polls as speculated, Datuk Seri Najib Razak said today, adding that the ruling coalition was taking steps to strengthen its east Malaysian fortress.
The prime minister told reporters today that despite rumours that more would follow in the footsteps of Beaufort MP Datuk Seri Lajim Ukin and Tuaran MP Datuk Seri Wilfred Mojilip Bumburing, BN was capable of dealing with the issue.
“It’s okay, at this point there are plenty of rumours going around but what is important is that we are confident that BN’s position is not under threat.
“We are able to face this challenge and we will be taking appropriate steps to remedy the situation and strengthen Umno’s and BN’s position,” he told a press conference here after chairing the Umno supreme council meeting today.
Najib said the Beaufort Umno division’s deputy chief will now take over as acting head, a post that Lajim had resigned from last weekend when announcing his decision to support Pakatan Rakyat (PR).
“We have also decided that Umno’s state liaison body will handle the operations of the Beaufort division and offer whatever help is needed there to ensure that Umno and BN’s positions would not be threatened,” he said.
When questioned if the duo’s exit would affect the timing of the general election, Najib shook his head in disagreement.
“No,” he said, before adding, “Well I don’t know when the elections will be held ― this year or next year. You cannot assume its next year, it could be this year. You cannot assume it’s this year, it could be next year.”
Delay?
The Malaysian Insider reported on Monday that the drawn-out exit of Lajim and Bumburing over the weekend was likely to delay the general election from a firm September date to end of the year as the ruling coalition works to retain its “fixed deposit” in the Borneo states.
BN sources in Sabah and Kuala Lumpur said the duo’s decision to back PR are among reasons that Najib is re-looking dates for a snap poll after Budget Day on September 28, as he seeks his personal mandate for the first time some three years and three months after taking power in April 2009.
“It is not likely in September now although Umno and its partners are ready for the polls,” a BN source from Kuala Lumpur said.
“Umno needs to make sure both Sabah and Sarawak remain a fixed deposit and provide the bulk of seats because the Malay vote is split in the peninsula,” the source added, referring to Umno’s share of only 79 seats in Election 2008.
Sources had earlier said that a snap poll was likely to happen in September if Najib carries through a plan to dissolve parliament in August, nine months before the BN mandate expires in April 2013.
There have been several dates bandied about in the past year although the country’s sixth prime minister has expressed confidence of sweeping the majority of all state and federal seats.
Before the latest defections, BN controlled 22 out of the 25 federal seats in Sabah and one in the Federal Territory of Labuan. In Election 2008, BN lost its customary two-third parliamentary majority largely due to significant losses in the peninsula, where it won just 85 seats while the opposition swept 80 seats.
BN’s saving grace was in Sabah, Sarawak and Labuan where the pact trounced the opposition and made a near-clean sweep, winning 55 parliamentary seats to the opposition’s two.
But after the weekend, BN now controls 136 federal seats while PR has 76 seats, SAPP two and eight independents in the 222-seat Dewan Rakyat.


























GE13: Regime change or persistence?

August 16, 2012
The 13th general election will put Najib’s administration into the final test in providing genuine reforms for the country.
COMMENT
by Khoo Ying Hooi
In an interview with the British daily The Guardian, Opposition Leader Anwar Ibrahim declared he is confident that Pakatan Rakyat will wrest power in the most talked-about general election due in April 2013.
“The mood is there, the mood for change.”
This is also exactly the pertinent question that has been lingering around in everyone’s mind since the 2008 election.
In the aftermath of the Asian financial crisis in 1997, many scholars expected to see a movement for democracy in the Southeast Asian region. Moreover, with the downfall of Suharto’s authoritarian regime in Indonesia, the transition of the country to democracy was seen as another crucial bit in the successive waves of democratisation that had been sweeping the world since the mid-1970s.
As in the case of Malaysia, despite the mass protests staged in 1998 due to Anwar’s arrest on sodomy charges, the ruling regime was still able to weaken the opposition, which subsequently resulted in its poor performance in the 2004 election.
The Reformasi movement then was unable to bring about democratic transition or political reform as desired.

Transformation of the opposition

If we take a glance at the history of Malaysian political parties, the opposition was pretty much fragmented with its internal rifts since independence until 1998.
Opposition politics emerged strongly at the height of the Asian financial crisis. Since 1998 the opposition had transformed into a reasonable cohesive alliance.
Prior to 1998, regular elections are used merely as a safety valve to curb any societal dissent and to confine the opposition to ensure the Barisan Nasional’s stability. But today, things have changed and an increasingly prominent political opposition has stirred up the electoral arrangements.
Earlier, the Barisan Alternatif did not survive and finally fell apart after a few years mainly due to the internal fracture combined with the suppressive controls by the ruling regime.
Nonetheless, the second transformation saw Pakatan Rakyat coming into play. It is seen to have learnt from past mistakes by moving forward with clearer visions and strategies. Pakatan now has a serious chance of taking over the federal government.
The dynamics of party politics have changed extensively since 1998 and more so since the 2008 political tsunami. Indeed, most scholars of Malaysian politics would agree that since independence, the political regime in the country has remained exceptionally resilient and resistant to change until the 2008 election.
Over time, there are many factors that contributed to the desire for change among the citizens. First and foremost is the increasing pro-democratic sentiments that surrounded the middle class.
We could also observe the intensified interaction of political parties and the civil society forces based on numerous street demonstrations such as Bersih and Hindraf as well as many other forms of political protests.
The emergence of the new media, among other factors, has challenged the existing political landscape. Apart from that, the deteriorated legitimacy within the BN is also among the factors that led to the current scenario.
Moreover, there are also a number of factors that resulted in rising discontent among Malaysians, including rising crimes which caused quite a stir in the media recently. Also, the rising costs of living, money politics, corruption scandals, the inconsistency of the judicial system, and the like.

Expecting a regime change?

Democratisation in Malaysia has been hindered for a long time.
Despite the rapid legislative and policy reforms by the Najib’s administration, the sincerity of the government to effectually implement reforms has repeatedly been called into question.
It is mainly due to the lack of public consultation and most importantly, the hasty time frame within which legislative reforms have taken place. This proved that the reforms were merely political ploys to win back the voters.
The 2008 election and subsequent 16 by-elections may be seen as the extension of the new era of politics in the making. It is rather clear that the ruling regime is struggling to regain its political strength.
Put it in another way, the BN hegemony has become increasingly vulnerable and it is facing a legitimacy crisis – it could no longer firmly represent Malays and non-Malays.
At this stage, it is safe to say that any potential transition to a full-fledged democracy in Malaysia will most probably occur primarily in the electoral arena. Unlike the neighbouring countries, mass protests in Malaysia are often promptly transferred to the party system.
The 13th general election will put Najib’s administration into the final test in providing genuine reforms for the country.
Although the 1999 and 2008 elections may not have initiated a new democratic regime, they have definitely opened important chapters in the struggle for democracy in Malaysia. Anwar’s PKR, which won merely one seat in 2004, emerged as the largest opposition party in 2008 in a short span of time.
The opposition had to some extent managed to build a collective platform for multi-culturalism, social justice, and more equitable development. Most importantly, the major peninsular opposition parties were united and received the overwhelming support of a wide range of civil society.
However, it is not only the BN that is facing challenges. States ruled by Pakatan are also facing a crisis in governance. This will no doubt blow up from time to time.
The central question now is the extent of reforms that Anwar will be able to effect if he takes over Putrajaya. Major political changes are never assured, but they are often possible as politics is an unpredictable game.
It remains attainable for the BN to restore its hegemony, as it did in the 2001-2004 elections. On the other side of the coin, it would be a historic moment if Anwar succeeds in ousting the current administration.
Anyhow if he fails, the political landscape of Malaysia would still have been adjusted.
The writer is an academic staff in Universiti Malaya and a PhD candidate in the University Putra Malaysia. She is a FMT columnist and can be contacted at yinghooi@gmail.com.



























BN poised for bigger win in GE13, says OSK Research

October 21, 2011
KUALA LUMPUR, Oct 21 — A major investment bank has said that Barisan Nasional is likely to improve on its performance in the 2008 general election due to indications of a swing of support to the ruling coalition.
OSK Research in a report yesterday said that the incumbent government was likely to increase its share of parliamentary seats and that most investors were expecting the general election to be held by March 2012.
“This expectation is premised on indications that certain communities have swung their support back towards the BN since early 2010,” said OSK.
“While we cannot predict the  number of seats that the BN may clinch, we believe that it would be an improvement over the 63 per cent secured in 2008.”
The report also said that based on the 2008 polls and the news flow since then, the three west coast states of Kedah, Perak and Selangor were expected to be major battlegrounds.
It also broke down the geographical support, with Pakatan Rakyat dominating urban centres, the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia and the rural Malay heartland in the north of the peninsula reflecting its alliance of components comprising Islamic fundamentalists, secular urbanites and moderate reformers.
The ruling BN coalition, meanwhile controls the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia, which reflects its more development-focused agenda.
The report also said that based on the stock market’s historical performance, a one-month post-election strategy — which entails buying into the market just prior to an election and selling out about a month after — was the most consistent in terms of returns.
“This strategy gives the second highest probability of a positive return,” said OSK.
“The average returns over the past eight elections from employing such a strategy are also the second highest among other possible strategies, such as buying six months prior to an election, or holding for three months post-election.”
It also recommended a “short and tight” approach to trading during election season as polls are in general a short-term localised driver.
Among strategies recommended for election season include waiting for profit-taking ahead of the general election before entering the market, buying just before the election date and riding on the positive post-election sentiment, exiting about one month after the elections and focusing on blue-chips in the banking, O&G and construction sectors rather than on so-called “election plays”.
Barisan Nasional under Datuk Seri Najib Razak has had a mixed record in by-elections since 2008 but won most of the most recent by-elections, including Tenang in January in addition to also winning the Sarawak state election.
The latest survey from local pollster Merdeka Center showed that Najib’s popularity slid to 59 per cent this August from the highest level of 79 per cent in May 2010, fuelled by rising concerns over the surge in living costs and his government’s handling of the July 9 Bersih 2.0 rally.
While Najib’s economic reforms have been selective and limited, the prime minister may have benefited from a boost to his credibility and appeal in September by announcing plans to repeal the Internal Security Act (ISA) and three Emergency Declarations.
In his recently unveiled 2012 budget, Najib also committed to cash handouts, more money for civil servants, schools, a fund for “high-impact development” projects and a financial windfall for Felda settlers, moves that could bolster Barisan Nasional’s traditional support base.























BN may field NGO leaders as GE 13 looms

By Mohd Fazil & Patsy Thomas


Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak
Kuala Lumpur : Prime Minister, Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak may have a vibrant new plan in the pipeline in ensuring a win for Barisan Nasional (BN) in the coming 13th General Election. This is by fielding several leaders from non-governmental organisations (NGO’s) as “winnable candidates” for the coming 13th General Election (GE).

As party president, Najib set the tone at Umno’s general assembly last December by declaring that only “winnable candidates” would be fielded. His aim is for each candidate to be accepted by the voters.

When a political party plans for an election, the candidate selection is an important process. Not only is it crucial as a party’s strategy tool, it also determines the quality of a Parliament and its government.

As Najib prepares BN for the coming GE, he has made the selection of “winnable candidates” a key element in re-energising the government coalition. This is where NGO leaders who are seen as dedicated people advocates will help the party in achieving its aim of ‘putting the people first’.

Gerakan deputy president, Datuk Chang Ko Youn says BN is currently shortlisting names of potential candidates which include potential NGO leaders.

“The Prime Minister has been in consultation since 2009 in finding the best formula to regain the people’s support for the coming GE. This includes fielding candidates who are not politicians who may be among NGO leaders,” he said when contacted by The Malaysian Times (TMT).

Among NGO leaders who is seen as being vocal are Kelantan People Action Council Che Azmi Mohd Ali and PEKIDA Datuk Dr Mohd Fuad Ahmad.

TMT contacted FOMCA president, Datuk Marimuthu Nadason to get his opinion on this matter. He said the involvement of NGO leaders in the political arena is not new. Even Datuk Seri Anwar Ibrahim came from the Malaysian Islamic Youth Movement (ABIM).

“The 12th GE in 2008 saw many NGO leaders such as Charles Santiago, R. Sivarasa, Elizebeth Wong and Manogaran joining the opposition party. These are individuals with caliber and is well-known by the public,” he said.

He added that BN can also follow suit but what’s important is the fielding of candidates who will work for the people.

Muslim Consumers Association of Malaysia secretary general, Datuk Dr Ma’amor Osman stressed that candidates chosen should fulfill the six criterias below:

1. To have been in service for the people;
2. To have a stable financial record;
3. To have his/her own networks;
4. To have relevant educational background;
5. To be free from personal scandals;
6. To have a good health record

“Whoever is fielded as candidates should have a good personal record in order to avoid issues from arising,” he said.

Meanwhile, Cheras Umno division chief, Datuk Wira Syed Ali Alhabshee when contacted said he welcomed the motion, however, he stressed that these candidates should fight for the people’s right.

“ The current political scenario is filled with non-political drama instead of efforts to fight for the people. If the presence of NGO leaders may correct this situation, than this is a move that I welcome with open arms,” he said. -TMT



























GE13: Time is fast running out for Najib


NONE
Nigel Aw
 If the old adage that one week in politics is a long time is anything to go by, then one election cycle may be seen as an eternity.
As Prime Minister Najib Abdul Razak races against time to restore BN to its former glory, eternity is a luxury he does not have.
With less than a year left before the 13th general election deadline, speculations of a snap election have repeatedly fizzled out despite the prime minister’s continuous hints of such a move.
The closest signal yet was when Najib visited a Felda settlement in Pahang on May 8, where he cheekily said of the warm reception: “If this is the kind of support that we are getting, then I think we can dissolve Parliament tomorrow.”
That was more than two weeks after MPs rushed to pass close to two dozen bills in Parliament, including Najib’s political reforms – an arduous task that required Parliament’s clock to be frozen in a move not seen in 22 years.
But like speculations many times before, the dissolution of Parliament did not materialise, indicating that Najib is still not confident enough to get the mandate from the people.
Though detractors would like to believe that this was because the prime minister has had a difficult time in office, Najib has in fact restored some stability with BN as chief of the ruling coalition.
Taking power on April 3, 2009 from his predecessor Abdullah Ahmad Badawi who was pressured to leave after leading the BN to its worst electoral performance in 36 years, Najib inherited a coalition that was in shambles.
NONEBut three years later, MCA chieftains have ended their open civil war while the former MIC strongman S Samy Vellu was finally convinced to hand over power to a successor.
Umno warlords too have coalesced around Najib’s leadership and – at least for now – they do not appear ready to make a move to unseat him as they did to his predecessor.
Despite the stronger position of the BN machinery today, the spectre of Abdullah’s political demise for failing to retain the two-thirds majority in Parliament in the 2008 general election is a cause for Najib’s concern.
Najib’s middle class dilemma
Mindful that the elusive super-majority hinges on a largely progressive-minded middle class, Najib on the eve of Malaysia Day last year announced a slew of political reforms, including the abolition of the colonial-inherited Internal Security Act.
But having to juggle the reforms with push-backs from ultra-conservatives within Umno – who are finding it difficult to adopt to progressive ideas after decades of ethno-nationalism – the middle class and professionals have dismissed the changes as half-hearted.
Instead, many responded by turning out in force for the Bersih 3.0 protest which, aimed at electoral reform, attracted various dissenting groups upset with the government. Organisers claimed the April 28 rally attracted up to 250,000 people, the largest since the Reformasi protests of 1999.
Caught between rivals bidding their time against Najib if he is not able to revive BN’s electoral fortunes and an adamant middle class hungry for genuine reforms, the prime minister has sought to buy more time to ensure stronger electoral support.
Putting part of his fiscal economic reforms that would require unpopular moves such as subsidy cuts and the introduction of the goods and services tax on the back burner, Najib has embarked on a campaign to dangle carrots to the more malleable groups in a bid to cover ailing support from the middle class.
Since early this year, Najib has made appearances at gatherings of targeted groups, such as Felda settlers, petty traders and taxi drivers, showering them with goodies.
NONEAt such gatherings,Felda settlers’households were given RM15,000 each, while taxi drivers drove off with RM520 in tyre vouchers and petty traders received large discounts for their licence renewal.
This was on top of BN’s ‘Janji Ditetapi’ (Promises Kept) campaign across the country to remind people about the various populist policies and disbursements under the banner of 1Malaysia.
Najib boasted during his gathering with the cabbies last Sunday that the Taxi Rakyat 1Malaysia (TR1Ma) voucher was an “addition to the long list of 1Malaysia brands”, including Bantuan Rakyat 1Malaysia (BR1M), the two KR1Ms – Klinik Rakyat 1Malaysia and Kedai Rakyat 1Malaysia – and a slew of other “products” under a slogan that has turned into a brand name.
With time and money, the prime minister hopes that if he cannot lead BN to regain the much sought two-thirds majority, then he can at least out-perform his predecessor’s 140-seat victory in the 222-seat Parliament that will ultimately decide his political fate in Umno as well.
This is on top of his ambition to regain Selangor, one of the wealthiest states in the country that has traditionally been a source of patronage for the Umno grassroots.
However, time does not appear to be on Najib’s side as Parliament will automatically dissolve, going by the federal constitution, when it reaches its full five-year term by April 29 next year, forcing fresh elections within 60 days.
‘Perfect weather’ may turn to storm
While waiting will allow Najib more time to woo voters from more groups, it may prove to be a double-edged sword as it can also undo the inroads made in other areas.
Soon after coming to power, Najib announced a slew of liberalisation exercises for the economic sector, which invited cautious optimism from the business community.
But with the uncertainty of a snap general election looming continuously, even the optimists within the business community grew impatient, with Federation of Malaysian Manufacturers president Yong Poh Kon urging Najib to get on with the election as the uncertainty is hurting businesses.
NONEEven Najib’s National Key Results Areas (NKRA), which initially receivedmuch attention, albeit with some scepticism from the opposition, have began to lose their sparkle.
One example is the government’s insistence that crime, one of the country’s NKRAs, has dropped despite a surge in violent crimes reported in recent months.
The insistence of technocrats in bandying numbers has provenconfusing. Not empathising with the citizens on their growing fears and not focusing on doubling efforts to curb crimes has not helped Najib’s administration.
As Najib criss-crosses the nation, lending star power from his fairly high approval ratings to BN, the question that begs to be answered is whether the he can gain more new ground than he loses by waiting for the “right time” to call the election.
His star power may not necessarily translate into votes, as seen from a Merdeka Centre report that shows the BN government achieving a much lower approval rating than Najib himself.
NONEHowever, the greatest risk Najib could face if he continues to wait for the right time to call the general election would be the little room he would have left for damage control should a new scandal plague the BN.
This was the case with the National Feedlot Corporation scandal, which dragged on for four months.
Fortunately for the BN, that issue has been mitigated – though it remains a potent topic for the opposition – after government tookmeasures bycharging NFC chairperson Mohamad Salleh Ismail with criminal breach of trust.
While pundits continue to move their predicted general election dates to later this year, while some suggest it could even be early next year, Najib may prove them wrong by going for it soon – or the ‘perfect weather’ he is waiting for could well be a ‘perfect storm’.


























KUALA LUMPUR, — New faces are expected to dominate the candidate lists from both Barisan Nasional (BN) and Pakatan Rakyat (PR) as both court the nearly three million new voters in the coming elections slated as early as this September, sources say.
The Malaysian Insider understands that BN is drawing professionals from a number of agencies, including Putrajaya’s efficiency unit PEMANDU, in its quest to regain the two-thirds parliamentary majority and states lost to PR in Election 2008. PR component parties have received hundreds of resumes from those who think they can do a better job as lawmakers.
“Datuk Seri Najib Razak  is going through the list a few times. Each seat has at least four possible candidates and he wants the best, the winnable there,” a BN source told The Malaysian Insider, using the prime minister’s term for those capable of winning seats.
Najib, who chairs the 13-member ruling coalition, has told the component parties that seat allocation will now be based on potentially-winning candidates rather than the previous formula of sharing seats as the MCA, MIC and Gerakan did badly in Election 2008.
Among the changes are the BN chairman personally selecting and recommending candidates for those parties apart from his Umno, particularly younger people who can attract the youth vote. The prime minister has launched several programmes, including tweetups and last week’s 1 Malaysia for Youth (1M4U) in the capital city, to bring the younger generation to his side.
“Najib is thorough. He is already eyeing one candidate from PEMANDU, and we are not talking about Idris Jala, to get more support,” another source said, referring to the efficiency agency, Performance Management and Delivery Unit, headed by Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Datuk Seri Idris Jala. Jala is a senator but is not a member of any BN component party.
The Malaysian Insider reported yesterday that the Najib administration was looking at a snap election in September before Malaysia Day if it goes through with a plan to dissolve Parliament next month.
Sources said Najib’s aides and BN officials have briefed a number of people on the plan to hold elections between Hari Raya Aidifitri, which falls on August 19, and the proposed Budget Day of September 28. Malaysia Day is on September 16.
But the prime minister, who is seeking his first personal mandate, had said on Saturday that BN had yet to finalise its candidates for the upcoming general election.
“The list will be finalised when the time comes. Everything else is just speculation,” Najib had said when asked about report saying he had rejected half of the names submitted for the list.
Umno information chief Datuk Ahmad Maslan said yesterday the party has activated its 6,667 district polling centres across the country to strengthen its election machinery as elections are near.
PR parties have also predicted possible polls after the Aidilfitri festivities, with PAS president Datuk Seri Abdul Hadi Awang saying BN was taking advantage of the possibility that voters would not return to their hometowns to cast their ballots so soon after the festive celebrations.
But PR sources said each party — PKR, PAS and the DAP — has already submitted preliminary lists to their leaders for the final selection.
“All party leaders have their lists and are going through them now. There are just a few seats that need to be swapped and that will be done when Parliament is dissolved,” a source told The Malaysian Insider.
A DAP source confirmed that there are a few new faces would be contesting in the general election although some veterans have indicated they want to stay on. “It is only natural because the 2008 victory has given confidence to many,” he added.
The Malaysian Insider learnt that PR’s federal seat allocation is 66 for PAS, 47 for the DAP and the rest for PKR including a few seats to be given to partners in Sabah and Sarawak. “We have to work with local parties in Borneo, so there will be some seats for them,” a PKR source said.
Nearly 13 million voters are eligible to cast their ballots if a general election is called involving all 222 federal seats and 505 seats in 12 states. However, the four PR-ruled states have yet to say if they will hold elections the same day as the general election as their mandates only expire next April. Sarawak has already had its state election last year.

























Peninsula Malay votes will determine next federal govt, says Wan Junaidi


Datuk Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar
KUCHING: The question of who will lead Putrajaya now lies in the hands of the Malays in Peninsular Malaysia, said Deputy Speaker of Parliament Datuk Dr Wan Junaidi Tuanku Jaafar.
He said whilst the majority of Malays in Sarawak and Sabah are solidly behind BN, Malays in the Peninsula are divided into three major factions; namely Umno, PAS and PKR.
“If the present government ever falls it’s because the Malays in Peninsular Malaysia are divided.
“They are divided into three factions now; namely PAS, Umno and PKR. Those in the urban areas tend to support PKR and the kampong people are split into two, by supporting Umno and PAS.
“So I hope the Malays in Peninsular Malaysia will be united in supporting BN if they want the present government to continue to lead the country,” Wan Junaidi told the media at his Hari Raya open house here yesterday.
He also hoped that the people in Sarawak would not be hoodwinked by Peninsula-based opposition parties who came here only to split them.
“When they come here, it’s not only the Malays that they divide but also the Dayaks as well,” he said.
Wan Junaidi, who is also Santubong MP, said he would leave his political future to the top leadership of BN to decide.
“All these while, I have been serving the people of all races and I have been allocating my MPR grants to them regardless of their religious background, be they Muslims, Christians or Buddhists.
“So, I hope BN leaders will get the feedbacks from the people at the grassroots whom I have served faithfully,” he added.
He said the RM1.5 million ‘touch-point’ allocation for each MP under Prime Minister Datuk Najib Tun Razak’s administration had been fairly distributed to his constituents.
Santubong has 112 Malay villages, 40 Iban and Bidayuh villages and three major Chinese settlements.
Meanwhile, Wan Junaidi, who is a lawyer by profession, refused to comment on the state’s official religion as debated by some opposition members because Islam was already the official religion of the federation.
“We are free to practise whatever religions in Sarawak, much freer than west Malaysia. So we should not politicise this issue here,” he said.


























DAP in push for new voters to narrow gap with BN

UPDATED @ 02:35:29 PM 22-08-2012
August 22, 2012

Loke and Subang Jaya assemblyman Hannah Yeoh (right) pose with campaign material during the press conference to announce the registration drive, in Kuala Lumpur August 22, 2012 .— Picture by Hafidz Baharom
KUALA LUMPUR, Aug 22 ― The DAP will make a last-ditch effort to register more new voters in what it calls an effort to overcome the slim advantage in popular votes Barisan Nasional (BN) won over Pakatan Rakyat (PR) parties in Election 2008. BN secured 4.08 million votes in 2008 compared to PR’s 3.79 million ― a difference of fewer than 290,000 votes ― and the federal opposition hopes new voters in the next election can help tilt the balance towards the PR parties of DAP, PAS and PKR.
DAP said the nationwide voter registration campaign will start before September 15, on the expectation that Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak will call for the general election in January.
DAP Socialist Youth chief Anthony Loke told a press conference here today that the Election Commission (EC) had verified that there were still 3.3 million unregistered voters.
“This forms a very substantial 20.5 per cent of the total number of 16.2 million eligible voters,” he said.
“Hence, it is absolutely clear that newly registered voters will make a definitive difference in the next general election, as the number of unregistered votes far outnumber the margin between the two coalitions,” Loke said.
Loke said in the next three weeks, the three PR parties — DAP, PKR and PAS — will be setting up more than 40 voter registration sites at major shopping malls and at morning and night markets apart from registering new voters at their service centres.

He said the registration venues will be posted online next week at Reg2vote.com website. Those interested to register can also email their questions to info@reg2vote.com or call their hotline at 0168782472 during this campaign period.

He said the DAP will also be pushing greater voter registration awareness through social networks such as Facebook, Twitter and video-sharing website YouTube.

"These fans will have a reach of a few million other Facebook users should they share our message with their friends, many of whom we believe have not registered given their age profiles," Loke said. 

The DAP's  voter registration campaign video titled "Alamak! Kena Register!?" (Oh! I have to register?!) launched on YouTube last Saturday has been viewed as many as 7,981 times as at the time of today's press conference, Loke said.

He asked those eligible to be voters to register before September 15, the EC's cut-off date, to ensure they would qualify to cast their ballots in the next general elections, which he said is looking more likely to be called only next year.

"The deadline set by the EC for voter registration for the third quarter of 2012 ends September 30, but we need to give the EC a week to process all the forms we've collected," Loke said.
Parliament will automatically dissolve next April, paving the way for the 13th general elections, even if national polls are not called before then.

































Wednesday, 22 August 2012 09:39

Malaysian Indians, are they the KINGMAKERS of the 13th GE?

Written by  Christopher Fernandez, Malaysia Chronicle
Indians are enjoying their era of glory as both sides of the political divide – Barisan Nasional and Pakatan Rakyat – jump on the bandwagon to woo them as it is believed by politicians that Indian voters may be the kingmakers as their votes cast may be decisive in determining which side gets to govern at Putrajaya.
While the Chinese community appear to have all but deserted the Malaysian Chinese Association (MCA) and Gerakan to opt for DAP, and the Malays are skewered three-ways between PAS, PKR and UMNO, the Indians are being wooed deeply by Barisan Nasional and Pakatan appear to have also begun to reach out to the Indian community.
However, the state of the Indian community is under much stress and things are not looking up for them right now. The future of the Indian community is in limbo and this is due to a number of factors.
But the community should learn to sit up and pay heed to where they are heading in the quagmire of the currently changing Malaysian political landscape. This is important if they harbor any hopes of making an impact as a race in this country.
The Indian population dilemma
Long considered the third largest ethnic group in Malaysia, the Indian community now has a dwindling population that needs to be addressed or see themselves being eclipsed by persons of Indonesian origin as the third largest race in the country.
In the distant past if the Indian community had any difficulty, it was the exceedingly high birth rates in families that made up the Indian population in Malaysia. The birth of large numbers of infants in an Indian family caused much hardship and deprivation to them.
This was especially true among the Indian families working and residing in the rubber plantations in the rural areas of the country. While in the past this population explosion among the Indian community was viewed with concern, now, what is being viewed with equal concern is the declining birth rate among the Indians.
Falling birth rates among Indians have reached alarming proportions. Currently, Indians constitute only 9 per cent of the population of the nation as opposed to much higher percentages in the last few decades.
Whither the Indian community in Malaysia? This certainly means that Indians as a race have in all probability been displaced as the third major component or racial group in this country by the influx of legal and illegal Indonesian immigrants.
There are a number of factors that have led to the Malaysian Indian population dwindling. The most important fact is that the strength of their economic status has been downgraded causing them to either not marry or have few children as possible in the event they are married couples.
Another important factor is the emigration of much valued Indians, usually highly qualified and educated individuals, who have left Malaysia for greener pastures. Their departure along with their families in tow has left the Indian population in the country to dwindle further.
What is now becoming a bigger worry is the number of Indian youth that are opting to stay single or tying the knot at much older ages, usually well past their youthful years and causing the number of childless marriages among Indians to go on the rise.
While the Chinese community has addressed this problem among themselves by forming Cupid Clubs to play matchmaker and get single Chinese men and women to court and marry, the same measure may have to be adopted by Indian groups representing the community.
The formation of Cupid Clubs have caused a greater number of marriages to take place within the  Chinese community and Indian groups can also play a similar matchmaker role among the single Indian men and women in the country.
Economic deprivation and education hardship
Aside from the fact that the Indian community needs to repopulate itself, there is also a dire need for them to reinvent themselves in the sphere of economic activity so as to gain a larger share of the economic pie.
While on this front, several groups representing the interests of the Indian community have taken upon themselves the role to empower Indians by creating business and educational opportunities, the momentum needs to be sustained and to grow much further.
The admission of Indian students to public and private institutions of higher learning in this country has also witnessed a drastic drop in numbers. The reluctance of a growing number of Indian youths to secure a sound education and a brighter future is now glaringly evident.
Instead, what is happening is that Indian youth are more likely to be associated or linked with criminal and underworld activities, with Malaysian jails housing large numbers of Indian prisoners in ratio to the numbers of their population in the country.
This has caused the socio-economic status of the Indian to downgrade rapidly. There is a need by Indian groups representing and leading the Indian community to be more watchful and vigilant and to steer Indians, especially Indian youth, in the right direction.
Choosing between BN and PR
Najib Tun Razak, erstwhile prime minister of the nation, has been on a grand spending and allocation spree in his quest and bid to capture the hearts and minds and votes of the Indians in Malaysia.
Every inkling of need put forward by MIC or Indian groups is listened to and given careful attention by Najib and addressed without delay or hesitation. This has caused Najib to become likeable and seemingly an ally of the Indian community and they are soaking up his goodies with much delight.
But Indians being what they are, are also engaged in covert negotiations with Pakatan Rakyat to see what the opposition coalition has for them. This intriguing double act by Indian leaders and Indian groups representing the community has become noticeable as of late in the run up to the 13th GE.
Whether Indian votes will play a critical, pivotal role in determining which side of the political divide gets to govern from Putrajaya is however debatable. But what is certain is that Indians have upped the ante and have pushed to get maximum mileage from the overtures being showered upon them.
It just might be that what they have in mind is to squeeze Najib and BN for as much as they can before crossing over to PR in terms of casting their votes. This might be viewed as an act of betrayal towards Najib who has gone out on a limb to relieve them of their woes and problems.
Indians, however, it must be noted, nurture deep resentment towards BN-UMNO for what they perceive as acts of bullying, intimidation and oppression inflicted upon the community despite serving with distinction and loyalty to the state.
While Najib expectedly is striving to balm and heal their wounds, Indians with their seemingly much valued votes are playing their cards close to their chest and have so far given nothing away.
Up to now, it is inconclusive as to which direction the Indian voters will swing towards. But the best bets and indications from the community should be forthcoming during the campaign period of the 13th GE.
Meanwhile, the Indian community is pushing the limits with their demands and needs with both sides of the political divide as they feel they need to seek restitution of some kind for having experienced deprivation in the past.
A wake up call to the Indian community
While all is not lost, the Indian community needs to wake up to the challenges of a globalized world or they will only have themselves to blame for becoming failures in their own country.
The need is urgent and pressing that Indians in Malaysia not go into a time warp but be aware that they are a species under threat and in all likelihood may not count or favor anymore as voters or as an important ethnic group in the years to come.
It is therefore high time and imperative that Indians rise up and answer this wake up call to pull the community out of the doldrums and to strive to contribute in a greater and more meaningful and impactful way towards building Malaysian society.
Malaysia Chronicle 















GE 13 in 2013?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Snap polls likely in September before Malaysia Day, say sources

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Who still cares about the election date? — Lim Sue Goan

 

 

 

 

 

 

VOTE THE BEAUTY IN AND THE BEAST OUT!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Give BN a chance PLEASE lah, Desperado PM begging Selangor voters

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

GE-13: UMNO-BN targets Selangor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

THE INEVITABLE DISSOLUTION OF A CORRUPT AND EVIL REGIME... (REPRISE)

 

 

 

 

 

 

Presidents, Prime Ministers and Justices et.al are not above the Law

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arrest Mahathir and Win GE-13 in a BIG Way

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr M & the Sabah RCI: 'Mother of all gambles' that Najib has already LOST

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dr M: Reject BN and opposition will destroy country

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mahathir, a racist Malay chauvinist - TRUE OR FALSE?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Umno creating racial bogeymen to woo Malay voters, PR leaders say

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

R.A.H.M.A.N. Prophesy: Najib may NOT be the 6th Prime Minister

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia's 6 prime ministers: When did the corruption and racism start?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Najib warns of 'crushed bodies', 'lost lives', 'ethnic cleansing' if status quo not kept

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Essay: Violence and GE 13 (Malaysiakini)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RISING BN VIOLENCE towards the Opposition: Surendran & Kian Ming latest victims

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Desperado-Last Premier from Umno-BN Najib will do a last minute Santa Claus stint dishing out goodies during his Budget speech on 28th September 2012 and after which the announcement for the Polling Day will be proclaimed to be on most likely (the date predicted) Sunday 14th October!

 

 

 

 

GE 13 : VOTE WISELY, VOTE FOR A BETTER MALAYSIA

 

 

 

 

 

 

Be "conscious" of your political rights, Christians told to vote for a BETTER M'SIA













































What You Can Do Against Fraud


Join BERSIH 2.0 in its struggle for free and fair elections!
Check your registration and the registration of your family in the electoral roll: (http://daftarj.spr.gov.my/NEWDAFTARJ/daftarjbi.aspx)


Report irregularities at jompantau@komas.org or upload your report directly at www.pru13.info


You can become an active monitor by joining the trainings by Jom Pantau or Tindak Malaysia. Click on the banners for more information.














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