Sunday, July 22, 2012

Fight crime, not squabble over statistics, says anti-crime group

Fight crime, not squabble over statistics, says anti-crime group

 

July 22, 2012

KUALA LUMPUR, July 22 — The government and its critics should stop squabbling over crime statistics and concentrate on improving public safety, the Malaysian Crime Prevention Foundation (MCPF) has said.
Its chairman Tan Seri Lee Lam Thye suggested that both the police and the public boost their crime-fighting efforts to address fear, improve perception and keep the streets safe.
“Growing public concern for crime prevention is a sign that Malaysians are concerned about increasing crime rates and their eagerness to prevent crimes from happening.
“This is not the time to fight over statistics but rather a time to think of ways to make the public feel safe and secure,” he was quoted as saying in the New Straits Times today.
It was previously reported that a crime index released by the police and Performance Management and Delivery Unit (Pemandu) has been disputed by many parties, leading to a negative public perception of police efforts to fight crime.
On July 12, Pemandu released fresh statistics that showed the country’s crime index had dipped by 10.1 per cent to 63,221 cases between January and May this year from the 70,343 cases recorded in the corresponding period in 2011.
Lee added police are sensitive to the public’s negative perception of the national crime rate but that they must do all they can to reduce the negativity.
The recent spate of robberies, kidnappings and snatch thefts across the country has raised public concern over safety.
“It is not surprising that the public is negative about the police’s efforts given the fact that many Malaysians have become victims of crimes or have relatives or friends who had been victims.
“However, we (Malaysians) should not look at increasing crime rates negatively. Rather, we must be optimistic,” Lee said.
The MCPF also acknowledged the public’s desire for improved efforts at crime prevention and said that it hoped to see more Malaysians participating in awareness programmes about what could and should be done to prevent crime.
Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein recently admitted that the public’s “perception” of security is more important than the actual crime rate as he attempted to calm growing public scepticism about the government’s persistent claims that incidents of crime had fallen.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crime is rising, police are corrupt & inefficient: NOW, WHO'S TO BLAME?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crime, she researched

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cops want charges in Soi Lek’s brother case

 

 

 

 

 

 






MACC Chief breaks silence and responds on Copgate

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mat Zain: Musa, Gani duped Dr M into sacking Anwar

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The unholy trinity - Remove the A-G and Reform

 













Hishammuddin Hussein - Home Minister 















Hishamuddin Sleeping On The Job

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hishammuddin blames demonization of police for high crime rate – as outrageous as his keris-wielding in the past


Home Minister, Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein’s blaming of the country’s high crime rate on the demonization of institutions such as the police is as outrageous as his keris-wielding before the 2008 general election as Umno Youth leader.
This is Malaysian Insider’s report on Hishammuddin’s speech in Parliament yesterday in the winding-up of his Ministry during the 2010 Budget debate:


Hishammuddin: Demonisation of police main cause of high crime rate By Shazwan Mustafa Kamal
KUALA LUMPUR, Nov 12 — Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishammuddin Hussein blamed the country’s high crime rate on the demonisation of institutions such as the police.
He said this in Parliament yesterday evening, immediately drawing stinging criticisms from members of the Opposition.
“Institutions such as the police force are made to be seen as irresponsible, as bad when they are also at the same time just trying to do their jobs. Besides PDRM, the delay in the various trials and judging process is also one of the factors for the escalation of the nation’s crime rate,” said Hishammuddin.
He said one of the ways to deal with the matter is to speed up the legal process.
He also identified four major states in the country as havens for criminal activities — Penang, Selangor, the Federal Territory and Johor. However, he said that the crime wave in Selangor and the Federal Territory has gone down drastically due to measures taken by the ministry as well as the police.
Among these measures are the increase in police presence and surveillance in 50 identified hot spots (crime-riddled areas). This has apparently been effective in minimising the number of criminal cases.
Petaling Jaya Utara MP Tony Pua hit out at this plan, saying that while crime in the hot spots had indeed decreased, the crime wave in the other “peaceful” areas in the country had in effect increased as police officers from these stations were relocated to help assist those in the hot spot areas.
The government also plans to install CCTV cameras in several areas..
“Kuala Lumpur City Hall (DBKL) plans to install an additional 100 CCTV cameras to the existing 82 units in Kuala Lumpur by the year 2010. A total of 496 units will be installed by the Local Government Ministry (JKT) in all the states in Peninsular Malaysia,” stated the Home Minister.
The police will also be given RM90 million to upgrade facilities and police stations throughout the country.
DAP secretary-general Lim Kit Siang lashed out at Hishammuddin for failing to provide a complete sense of security to the public.
“In the Home Ministry website there is an online poll which states 90 per cent of visitors to the site do not feel safe at all with regards to the crime rate in Malaysia.
“No one wants to politicise people’s safety. We need to admit that this country’s crime problem is serious,” said Lim.

 

 

 

     

 

Hishammuddin Hussein - Home Minister 















Hishamuddin Sleeping On The Job

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Why police are impotent in dealing with growing crime


Dr Lim Teck Ghee
CPI
A few days ago a colleague sent me a copy of an email which read:
Though the government is denying it, we are seeing severe escalation of serious crime in the country. At lunch today, I learnt from a member of [respectable organization] that the xxxxxx Embassy is now holding briefings on crime and precautions. There is also a recent entry of some [foreign] crime groups. We are all living in fear….Most people would agree that the current crime rate is the worst we have ever seen. When victims lodge police report, often police will refuse the report as it affects their KPI.
There is a witticism which states that “there are lies, damn lies and statistics”.
A reminder of the close proximity between statistics and damn lies should be sent to Pemandu, the government’s Performance Management and Delivery Unit in the Prime Minister’s Department which has staunchly defended statistics showing street crime has fallen by 40 percent in the past two years. According to Pemandu too, the country’s crime index fell by more than 10% between January and May this year – a claim which has drawn hoots of derision from readers in the internet media.
It is a fact that Malaysians are cynical of the statistics put out by the government. Although the government has been at pains to argue that there is a declining trend in crime, the man in the street does not believe the government. The average Ali, Siva and Chong is even more agitated when the government blames the issue of escalating crime on public perception and blown-up media accounts.
The truth is that our government friendly media are underreporting rather than over-reporting on crime and violence. Let’s be frank and admit that the official statistics on crime, especially petty crime, are unreliable.
Unlike the statistics collected by the Department of Statistics, police statistics are generated by front line personnel who have a vested interest in underreporting. Everyone knows that police personnel have every incentive to avoid extra work through understating crime incidence. They also do not want to give a bad name to the police district if they can help it. Under-recording of actual cases of crime is very much the norm in most police stations.
No need to argue with the public
It is difficult for the government to convince Malaysians that the police statistics are believable since there is no way the public can monitor how the statistics are generated or processed.
If we go by neighbourhood and other grassroots accounts, it appears as if episodes of house break-in, handbag snatching, armed robbery and other criminal acts have become commonplace instead of being the exception.
Rather than trying to argue with the public on crime statistics, it is more prudent for the government to acknowledge the surge in criminal activity, especially of petty crime and to take strong measures to prevent it from getting worse.
How to combat growing crime
Amongst necessary measures, these should have priority:
1. Instilling a greater sense of responsibility and urgency in the police top brass on tackling crime. Trying to defend the police or deflect legitimate criticism is the wrong approach.
2. Requiring that a greater proportion of police personnel be assigned to work on the beat instead of at the office.
3. Adopting William Bratton’s policing philosophy. This veteran police officer who is advisor to the British Prime Minister David Cameron on law and order is an advocate of the ‘broken window’ criminological theory of the norm setting effect of urban disorder and vandalism on additional crime and anti-social behaviour. The theory which has been well backed by empirical research argues that monitoring and maintaining urban environments in a well-ordered condition stops further vandalism and escalation into more serious crime.
4. Bratton is also a strong advocate of having an ethnically diverse police force representative of the population; maintaining a strong relationship with the law-abiding population; tackling police corruption; being tough on gangs and having a strict no tolerance of anti-social behaviour.
All of these are commonsense measures aimed at instilling a higher degree of professionalism and requiring our police and urban authorities to focus on protecting the public from criminals. They should be implemented without further delay.
Tackling police impotency at the roots
We also have to tackle the problem of an ineffective police force – the Special Brach may be a lone exception – at its roots. In the past, these root causes may have something to do with small size of the force and poor pay. Today they are unacceptable as reasons to explain the relative inefficiency or impotency of the police.
According to United Nations survey, the Malaysia police force is a very large one compared with other countries at similar stages of development. The United Nations recommends a minimum police strength of 222 per 100,000 people. Our number is much higher than this. In 2000, we reported having 354 police per 100,000 people. By comparison in 2007, Singapore had 239 police officers per 100,000 people.
As for poor pay leading to demoralized personnel, police salaries have recently gone up considerably for all ranks of personnel. Our police today cannot by any measure be considered to be underpaid.
The root causes of police impotency are found in at least two major factors. This description of crime and industrialization in Britain is instructive.
“Crime was rising due to dislocation and poverty and the apparatus of criminal justice was …increasingly ineffective. During the period 1805-1842 the proportion of people per 100,000 of the population committed for trial rose 7 times. This is of course what we should expect: rapid urbanisation with people uprooted from their traditional rural ways of life and forced into the intolerable poverty and overcrowding of the early factory towns. These festering conditions were exacerbated by the fluctuations in the labour market and the fact that workers were periodically thrown out of work without any social security or unemployment benefits….”
For us in Malaysia, the ‘broken window’ theory and the interaction of marginalized immigrant and local poor communities and rising inequality between ‘haves’ and ‘have-nots’ amidst visible affluence provide the breeding ground for breaking rules and anti-social behaviour.
Effete social policies, tolerance of white-collar and high-level crime, and widespread uncivil behaviour of the general population also provide our underclass the justification for their attempts to subvert the system.
Our situation compares poorly with Singapore where there is zero tolerance of corruption in the police and civil service, the ordinary citizen is socialized (some would argue, regimented) to higher standards of civic norms, and ‘broken windows’ are mended unlike in Kuala Lumpur where not only the backstreets but also the main streets are littered with garbage, unrepaired pavements and other visible symptoms of urban decay and the indifference of the authorities.
Perhaps the most important root cause is the trend towards the political use of the police. Instead of focusing attention on fighting crime, our police are all too often ordered to perform political work aimed at suppressing the opposition and other opponents of the ruling government.
This politicization of the police force has become worse, with the recent massive police mobilization for the Bersih 3.0 demonstration serving as a prime example.
Potential election game changer
The government must recognize that the growing incidence of crime has political ramifications.
The more the government engages in spinning the crime statistics, the more it denies there are major problems with our police force, the more it orders the police to take political sides; the more the government is alienating itself from the public and inviting an electoral backlash.
It will be poetic justice if the politicization of our police force is one of the factors responsible for the Barisan Nasional’s downfall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hishammuddin Hussein - Home Minister 















Hishamuddin Sleeping On The Job

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

How to combat growing crime

July 24, 2012
The average Ali, Siva and Chong are even more agitated when the government blames the issue of escalating crime on public perception and blown-up media accounts.
COMMENT
Lim Teck Ghee
A few days ago a colleague sent me a copy of an e-mail which read: “Though the government is denying it, we are seeing severe escalation of serious crime in the country. At lunch today, I learnt from a member of [a respectable organisation] that the… embassy is now holding briefings on crime and precautions. There is also a recent entry of some [foreign] crime groups. We are all living in fear… Most people would agree that the current crime rate is the worst we have ever seen. When victims lodge police report, often police will refuse the report as it affects their KPI [Key Performance Indicator].”
There is a witty phrase which states that “there are lies, damn lies and statistics”.
A reminder of the close proximity between statistics and damn lies should be sent to Pemandu, the government’s Performance Management and Delivery Unit in the Prime Minister’s Department, which has staunchly defended statistics showing street crime has fallen by 40% in the past two years.
According to Pemandu, too, the country’s crime index fell by more than 10% between January and May this year – a claim which has drawn hoots of derision from readers in the Internet media.
It is a fact that Malaysians are cynical of the statistics put out by the government. Although the government has been at pains to argue that there is a declining trend in crime, the man in the street does not believe the government.
The average Ali, Siva and Chong are even more agitated when the government blames the issue of escalating crime on public perception and blown-up media accounts.
The truth is that our government-friendly media are underreporting rather than over-reporting on crime and violence. Let’s be frank and admit that the official statistics on crime, especially petty crime, are unreliable.
Unlike the statistics collected by the Department of Statistics, police statistics are generated by frontline personnel who have a vested interest in underreporting.
Everyone knows that police personnel have every incentive to avoid extra work through understating crime incidence.
They also do not want to give a bad name to the police district if they can help it. Under-recording of actual cases of crime is very much the norm in most police stations.

No need to argue with the public

It is difficult for the government to convince Malaysians that the police statistics are believable since there is no way the public can monitor how the statistics are generated or processed.
If we go by neighbourhood and other grassroots accounts, it appears as if episodes of house break-in, handbag snatching, armed robbery and other criminal acts have become commonplace instead of being the exception.
Rather than trying to argue with the public on crime statistics, it is more prudent for the government to acknowledge the surge in criminal activity, especially of petty crime and to take strong measures to prevent it from getting worse.
How to combat growing crime
Among necessary measures, these should have priority:
Instilling a greater sense of responsibility and urgency in the police top brass on tackling crime. Trying to defend the police or deflect legitimate criticism is the wrong approach.
Requiring that a greater proportion of police personnel be assigned to work on the beat instead of at the office.
Adopting William Bratton’s policing philosophy. This veteran police officer who is an adviser to the British Prime Minister David Cameron on law and order is an advocate of the “broken window” criminological theory of the norm setting effect of urban disorder and vandalism on additional crime and anti-social behaviour. The theory which has been well backed by empirical research argues that monitoring and maintaining urban environments in a well-ordered condition stops further vandalism and escalation into more serious crime.
Bratton is also a strong advocate of having an ethnically diverse police force representative of the population; maintaining a strong relationship with the law-abiding population; tackling police corruption; being tough on gangs and having a strict no tolerance of anti-social behaviour.
All of these are common sense measures aimed at instilling a higher degree of professionalism and requiring our police and urban authorities to focus on protecting the public from criminals. They should be implemented without further delay.

Tackling police impotency at the roots

We also have to tackle the problem of an ineffective police force – the Special Branch may be a lone exception – at its roots.
In the past, these root causes may have something to do with small size of the force and poor pay. Today, they are unacceptable as reasons to explain the relative inefficiency or impotency of the police.
According to United Nations survey, the Malaysian police force is a very large one compared to other countries at similar stages of development.
The United Nations recommends a minimum police strength of 222 per 100,000 people. Our number is much higher than this.
In 2000, we reported having 354 police per 100,000 people. By comparison in 2007, Singapore had 239 police officers per 100,000 people.
As for poor pay leading to demoralised personnel, police salaries have recently gone up considerably for all ranks of personnel. Our police today cannot by any measure be considered to be underpaid.
The root causes of police impotency are found in at least two major factors. This description of crime and industrialisation in Britain is instructive.
“Crime was rising due to dislocation and poverty and the apparatus of criminal justice was…increasingly ineffective. During the period 1805-1842 the proportion of people per 100,000 of the population committed for trial rose seven times. This is of course what we should expect: rapid urbanisation with people uprooted from their traditional rural ways of life and forced into the intolerable poverty and overcrowding of the early factory towns. These festering conditions were exacerbated by the fluctuations in the labour market and the fact that workers were periodically thrown out of work without any social security or unemployment benefits…”
For us in Malaysia, the “broken window” theory and the interaction of marginalised immigrant and local poor communities and rising inequality between “haves” and “have-nots” amidst visible affluence provide the breeding ground for breaking rules and anti-social behaviour.
Effete social policies, tolerance of white-collar and high-level crime, and widespread uncivil behaviour of the general population also provide our underclass the justification for their attempts to subvert the system.
Our situation compares poorly with Singapore where there is zero tolerance of corruption in the police and civil service, the ordinary citizen is socialised (some would argue, regimented) to higher standards of civic norms, and “broken windows” are mended unlike in Kuala Lumpur where not only the backstreets but also the main streets are littered with garbage, unrepaired pavements and other visible symptoms of urban decay and the indifference of the authorities.
Perhaps the most important root cause is the trend towards the political use of the police. Instead of focusing attention on fighting crime, our police are all too often ordered to perform political work aimed at suppressing the opposition and other opponents of the ruling government.
This politicisation of the police force has become worse, with the recent massive police mobilisation for the Bersih 3.0 demonstration serving as a prime example.
Potential election game changer
The government must recognise that the growing incidence of crime has political ramifications.
The more the government engages in spinning the crime statistics, the more it denies there are major problems with our police force, the more it orders the police to take political sides; the more the government is alienating itself from the public and inviting an electoral backlash.
It will be poetic justice if the politicisation of our police force is one of the factors responsible for the Barisan Nasional’s downfall.
Dr Lim Teck Ghee is the director of the Centre for Policy Initiatives.



 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia experienced a slight increase in the poverty rate between 2007 and 2009, the first since the end of the 1999 Asian financial crisis, according to a survey conducted by the Department of Statistics.
The poverty rate went up from 3.6 percent in 2007 to 3.8 percent in 2009 while the hardcore poverty rate remained at 0.7 percent.
azlanAccording to the Household Income and Basic Amenities Survey Report 2009, the latest of the government's five-year survey which was unprecedentedly made public last month, the incidence of poverty in Malaysia showed a declining trend since 1995, except in 1999 and 2009. This is most likely due to the financial crisis that hit the country in those two years.
Among the states, Sabah still topped the list with a 19.7 percent poverty rate, followed by Perlis (six percent), Sarawak and Kedah (both 5.3 percent).
The poverty line income varies in different regions, and the benchmark used by the survey is shown in the chart (below).
However, the report does not provide the benchmark for hardcore poor.
The survey covered 45,805 families nationwide from April 2009 to March 2010 and contained statistics on household income distribution, basic amenities and the incidence of poverty in Malaysia.
This is the first time the survey, conducted twice every five years, has been released for public consumption.

azlanIn terms of wealth distribution, the gap between the rich and the poor widened marginally during the two-year period in late 2000s as shown by the Gini coefficient of household income, which increased from 0.440 in 2007 to 0.441 in 2009.
The value of the Gini coefficient ranges from 0 to 1 where ‘0' denotes complete equality of income share and ‘1' represents total inequality of income share.
This parameter has been fluctuating during the period of 1995 to 2009, with the highest figure recorded in 2002 (0.461), while the lowest was recorded in 2007 (0.440).
Malaysia has the distinction of having the second highest rich-poor gap in Asia after Papua New Guinea.
No figures are however provided for the poverty gap within races - among the Malays, Chinese, Indians and other ethnic groups.
Glaring inequalities
From another perspective, the average monthly household income of the top 20 percent of households was RM10,208, while that for the middle 40 percent and bottom 40 percent of households was RM3,770 and RM1,529 respectively.
The national average household income in 2009 - the latest year revealed by the survey - was RM4,025.
azlanThe percentage of households in the income bracket of RM5,000 and above showed a jump from 16.8 percent to 24.2 percent in the year 2009, as compared with 2004.
Meanwhile, the percentage of households in the income class of below RM2,500 decreased to 44.2 percent in 2009, compared with 56.2 percent in 2004.
The comparisons between income class in 2009 and 2007 were only illustrated by the Department of Statistics report through a chart, without the exact figures stated.
The gap between incomes in the urban and rural areas was significant, too. The average household income in urban cities was RM4,705 and it dropped by almost half to RM2,545 in the rural areas.
Income inequality between genders was also serious, with the men earning an average household income of RM4,219, while the figure for women wage earners stood at only RM2,958.











azlan    



























Tuesday, 24 July 2012 23:01

Casualties of BN cruelty: Did you know a RAPE occurs every 15 mins...

Written by  Christopher Fernandez, Malaysia Chronicle
If social ills today within Malaysian society have started to grow rapidly it will be quite right to lay the blame on the authorities and the police as custodians of law and order for neglecting the welfare of the state.
Every sphere of social ill in this country has started to witness a marked increase though this fact is often downplayed by the authorities or distorted by the use of statistics.
If any party is to be blamed, it should be the BN government for not looking into the concerns and worries of the people and instead opting for a lop-sided development of the nation which has caused those less capable to be susceptible and become victims in the push for economic growth.
Since the economic booms under the malevolent leadership of former premier Mahathir Mohammad, many Malaysians have succumbed to being victims of the UMNO-BN dictator who 'flogged' the backs of Malaysians to try and fulfill his flights of fantasy for the country.
A rape occurs every 15 minutes in Malaysia
For example, while the police confess that incidences of rape cases are on the rise, the contention by the All Women’s Action Society Malaysia is that it is not only on the rise but that “a rape occurs every 15 minutes in Malaysia.”
Raping is just the tip of the iceberg in the list of crime and social ills, and since Malaysia has a population of 28 million people at the last census, it can ill afford to allow these problems to go unchecked.
If left unchecked, Malaysia faces the bleak prospect of being a nation made up of more and more down-and-out people very soon.
But the media, NGOs and concerned individuals have from time to time been spearheading moves and directing the attention of the BN government, but to no avail so far, in wanting to see the authorities arrest the growing trend in social ills.
Growth of social ills
Ever since the boh sia and lepak episode was highlighted in the 90s, more social ills have started to creep into Malaysian society. We are now witnessing, in line with our bid to be a high income, developed nation by 2020, probably a high spike in the number of deviant persons with deviant behavior.
The vulnerable and the weak, or “soft targets” as psychologists term them, are the most abused and victims of much pain, anguish and suffering in this country which have not been attended or paid heed to by a blind and deaf BN government bent on wealth creation and the satisfaction of personal, private greed and consumption.
Even newborn babies are victims of the authorities whom seem to “encourage” the dumping of unwanted babies by stating openly that there are plans on the drawing board to operate more baby hatches as they seem to be gaining in popularity.
Is this the best solution? Other individuals and organisations are describing this measure as merely offering “symptomatic relief” and not tackling the root of the problem.
3 million are mentally disturbed
Further, if you were just to wander around the major towns and cities of the country, you will find a significant number of mentally and emotionally ill people.
This is because unofficial estimates by mental health experts put the number of mentally ill at around 10 per cent of the population which translates to close to 3 million Malaysians in need of some form of psychiatric or psychological care and counsel.
More down-and-out Malaysians
Added to this are the growing numbers of the beggar population that have become a menace to society.
Not only local beggars, but nowadays we have expatriate beggars from China, the Philippines and Myanmar vying for a share of Malaysians’ generosity not just in urban areas but also in the rural areas of the peninsular, Sabah and Sarawak.
While efforts to clampdown on these beggars are laudable, it is perhaps better to seek lasting measures rather than have to see them return to the streets to beg once they have been taken off the streets and sent for rehabilitation.
This issue needs to be addressed so as to discourage other weak-willed individuals who are indirectly victims of the BN leaders’ push for lop-sided development from resorting to this option to earn a living.
Aside from rehabilitating beggars, the measures by the authorities to turn around the lives of drug addicts have so far shown a very dismal performance.
This is simply the reason why drug abuse is still Public Enemy No.1 and has been so for the last three or four decades. Efforts to eradicate and eliminate this destructive behavior especially among youths needs to undergo a major revamp in line with the current situation.
The growing list of victims
Time and space does not permit in this forum to jot down the full list of woes that afflict Malaysian society today.
But there is the plight of single mothers and orphans, the Mat Rempits and Mat Sikals, the destitute and homeless, those disabled by the high rate of road accidents in the country, the unemployed and the hardcore poor are among the long list of Malaysians suffering from the ill-effects of BN’s lop-sided development.
This is why most of us have some form of awareness that Malaysia is now a land where the down-and-out are growing rapidly every year as we head towards the status of a fully developed nation by 2020.
While anyone will welcome the push to become an advanced and developed country, let us ensure the price we pay is fair and worth it.
Otherwise much of the benefits and gains of development may be lost in the form of having to nurse the sick and infirm and to put up with people that are a threat or a public nuisance.
The right thing to do will be to strive for a society that is whole and are able to integrate with one another and be able to meet the challenges of the future with confidence and assurance.
Only such a “prepared society” will prevail and triumph over adversity and challenges, difficulties, problems and crises in the coming future.
But as Malaysia stands today, the disarray that has begun to foment under the BN government is enough to assure right-thinking individuals that the future might not augur well for even more Malaysians as the list of casualties across society continues to grow.
Malaysia Chronicle
























Malaysiakini



'JI and reds claims meant to distract from crime issues'  

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QVaubx7KoKw&feature=player_embedded




The allegation by the Special Branch that communists and Jemaah Islamiah (JI) have infiltrated Pakatan Rakyat is merely a distraction from Home Minister Hishammuddin Hussein’s failure to tackle crime, PKR vice-president Nurul Izzah Anwar says.
“These statements are meant to divert attention from the home minister’s track record, for he has failed to tackle the rising crime rate.
“I urge that he performs his duties properly and not hurl such accusations in bad faith at the opposition,” Nurul Izzah told a press conference today.
She said the people should evaluate the minister’s track record, whom she said had released some 1,000 ‘hard core criminals’ held under the Emergency Ordinance and were later accused of contributing to a spike in the crime rate.
In the meantime, she said, Hishammuddin had mocked Internal Security Act detainees by saying that he would rather have lamb chops while they held a hunger strike.
‘Move to villify Pakatan Rakyat’
At the same press conference, Seputeh MP Teresa Kok accused Hishammuddin of using the police to make the communists-terrorists allegation in order to vilify Pakatan Rakyat.
“Hishammuddin used Special Branch officers to claim that communists and Jemaah Islamiah had infiltrated Pakatan Rakyat. After using the officer, he continued with the same statement.
“This gives the impression that he has ran out of political capital and has to revive old issues,” Kok said at the joint press conference of secretaries-general from Pakatan Rakyat parties.
Last Thursday, Special Branch’s E2 (M) national social extremist threat division assistant director Mohd Sofian Md Makinuddin claimed that the opposition parties were infiltrated by terrorists who wanted to become candidates in the next general election.
Hishamuddin later said that the infiltration has not yet become a national security issue and that action would be taken if it posed a threat.
Pakatan Rakyat has vehemently denied the allegation and challenged the police to name the infiltrators. The police have not responded.


























Tuesday, 24 July 2012 03:55pm
ImageThe Malaysian Bar is dismayed by the increasing attempts to blame the rise in the crime rate (in the state of Selangor and elsewhere) on the release of those detained under the now-revoked Emergency (Public Order and Prevention of Crime) Ordinance 1969 (“EPOPCO”, popularly referred to as the “EO”).

In recent times serious questions have arisen about the efficacy of the EPOPCO.  There have been numerous complaints of its abuse, including the use – or threat of use – of the EPOPCO by the police as a means of extorting money from innocent victims.  Wrong people were incarcerated or made subject to restricted residence under the EPOPCO, while those who were actually involved in crime remained free and mobile.  The fact that those detained under the EPOPCO were not required to be formally produced before the courts of this land helped facilitate this abuse.  While the press sometimes referred to those detained under the EPOPCO as “criminals”, it must be remembered that none of them was ever convicted in a court of law.  Even when those involved in crime were in fact detained, invariably these were “small fry”; the “big fish” continued to elude and evade being apprehended.

Thus the effort to attribute the worsening (perceived or real) current environment to the release of the EPOPCO detainees is without sure foundation.  Those who perpetuate and repeat such views, without the support of any actual evidence, are acting irresponsibly.

The simple truth remains: crime prevention requires solid policing.  The existence of the EPOPCO for over 42 years has meant that inadequate and incomplete investigative practices and policing procedures have become prevalent.

A poor workman blames his tools.  The police should not seek the excuse that because an unjust and unfair law that allowed for detention without trial and restricted residence is no longer at their disposal, criminal activities are perceived to be on the increase.  And that consequently, the only way to address this negative development is to bring back repressive laws and slow the pace of law reform.

The Malaysian Bar totally disagrees with this view.  The Malaysian Bar urges the Honourable Prime Minister to stay the course in respect of the path of law reform that he has undertaken, and to continue to remove outdated and unjust laws, and repeal unfair and prejudicial provisions of the criminal statutes.

The rule of law, together with proper policing and transparent law enforcement agencies, are the best way to tackle the issue of crime.  Rather than nostalgically harking back to a bygone era and archaic legislation, law enforcement officials should focus on better training, greater responsiveness, and higher professionalism to make our streets and neighbourhoods safer.  The Government must provide the necessary resources in order for the police force to have all necessary and legitimate resources at its disposal to battle crime.
Lim Chee Wee
President
Malaysian Bar
24 July 2012




















Playing politics of fear

Selena Tay | July 25, 2012
Have unskilled and jobless foreign workers become a threat to national security?
COMMENT
Former prime minister Dr Mahathir Mohamad has given a very strong hint that the 13th general election must be held this year. He has appeared on television in an electoral message, saying “Saya pilih mengundi” (I choose to vote).
Abdul Hadi Awang, who is the PAS president and Marang MP, has said that “it certainly looks like the polls will be held after the Aidil Fitri celebrations”.
This means that Parliament will have to be dissolved in August.
Like it or not, Mahathir has forced the hand of Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak and that is why Barisan Nasional has stepped up attacks on Pakatan Rakyat.
By using the outdated ploy of frightening the voters via the terminology of “JI” and “communists”, BN hopes that the voters will stop supporting Pakatan out of fear.
This is the politics of fear and BN’s psy-war machinery is running at top gear now. Nevertheless, it shows that BN is extremely desperate and has run out of ideas.
“But the worst method used by BN in garnering votes is by giving fast-tracked citizenship to the unskilled foreign workers with automatic insertion into the voter rolls in order for them to vote,” said a PAS central working committee member who declined to be named.
And the crime rate is now at a worrisome level due to the foreign worker gangs – Indonesians versus Myanmars, Vietnamese versus Bangladeshis – it resembles a free-for-all smackdown.
The whole nation may be crime-infested if Najib continues this unhealthy foreign worker policy, which will only jeopardise the welfare and wellbeing of ordinary Malaysian citizens. Clearly, this shows that he wants to win the election at all cost.
National security threat?
Crimes such as snatch thefts and house break-ins are now common in Kuala Lumpur and Petaling Jaya areas.
Although the police force has successfully busted many drug syndicates and vice dens and caught a good number of criminals, more could be done. However, the police force is also hard-pressed due to the massive influx of these unskilled foreign workers, many of whom indulge in criminal activities eventhough they may have a day job. Still, many are also unemployed.
Najib’s move to ignore the foreign worker problem is detrimental to the safety of genuine Malaysian citizens and now that these foreigners have been given MyKad, there is no turning back the clock.
Have these unskilled and jobless foreign workers become a threat to national security?
The situation is critical. The only way out is to revoke their fast-tracked citizenship and send the jobless home. And Pakatan leader, Anwar Ibrahim, has promised to do that if Pakatan wins the 13th general election.
Meantime, Najib is busy opening shops, handing out gifts and touring the nation in order to boost his image, oblivious to the problems that these foreign workers have caused.
As the leader of the nation, he is to be fully blamed for this mammoth problem. And the rising crime rate is certainly not a perception as people have died due to snatch thefts. Is death a perception?
Act of betrayal
Even this columnist had her handbag snatched thrice between March 2009 and March this year while walking on the road.
Even the clinic doctor who had attended to countless snatch theft victims advised this columnist not to carry handbags while walking on the road.
One cannot fully blame the police as they too find it difficult to cope, but the blame must fall squarely on the prime minister who is responsible for forever changing the demographics of the nation due to population re-engineering.
Never before in Malaysian political history has there been a prime minister who is so desperate to win that he is willing to compromise and neglect the safety of the citizens. His speech in late 2010 of wanting to defend Putrajaya at all cost will be the hallmark of his tenure.
Giving citizenship to unskilled foreign workers is tantamount to an act of betrayal of the rakyat’s trust. His victory at the polls will come at a great cost to the nation and to its citizens and for this reason alone, he does not deserve our vote.
Najib must apologise to the nation and take responsibility for this mess. Obviously, he does not realise that these foreign workers have now become a threat to public safety.
Selena Tay is a FMT columnist.

























Wednesday, 25 July 2012 17:47

Stop chasing shadows, fight the REAL criminals - Guan Eng tells "irrational" Hisham

Written by  Lim Guan Eng

DAP lauds the High Court decision yesterday that has unequivocally quashed the declaration by Home Minister Datuk Seri Hishamuddin Hussein that the Coalition for Clean and Fair Elections (Bersih) is an unlawful society.
In this landmark decision, High Court Judge Datuk Rohana Yusuf ruled that “the decision to outlaw Bersih impinges on the right guaranteed under the Federal Constitution and should not be taken in a just and lackadaisical manner.”
Further, Justice Datuk Rohana also said that Hishamuddin’s declaration on 1 July 2011 was “tainted with irrationality and it was made without taking into account the relevant facts.”
Heed the court's ruling
Now that the Court has ruled Hishamuddin’s actions as “tainted” and “irrational”, he should immediately apologise for unilaterally declaring Bersih illegal and allow it to be registered as a lawful society.
This decision has basically proven that Bersih is a legal movement and that the hundreds and thousands of Malaysians who participated in the Bersih 2.0 rally on 9 July 2011 and Bersih 3.0 on 28 April 2012 are actually law-abiding citizens who are not criminals. Unfortunately, because of Hishamuddin’s irrational decree, the police had treated them as if they were criminals.
Focus on the real threat
In the Bersih 3.0 rally earlier this year, many protesters including media workers and reporters had been subjected to indiscriminate police action including incidents of assault and confiscation of equipment. Previously in Bersih 2.0, hundreds of people were arrested leading up to the rally, including six PSM members who were detained without trial under the now-defunct Emergency Ordinance.
Instead of wasting energy and resources on political vendettas, chasing Islamist or communist shadows where there are none, and harassing legal movements such as Bersih and innocent civilians who participated in the rallies, Hishamuddin should do the rational thing and focus on fighting real criminals.
Lim Guan Eng is the Penang Chief Minister and DAP secretary-general
























Thursday, 26 July 2012 15:09

DISBAND the Police & MACC, set up NEW multiracial forces: STOP THE CRIME WAVE

Written by  Joe Fernandez, Malaysia Chronicle

It’s no longer a secret that there has been increasing criminalization of society and that the crime rate has gone through the roof particularly since the repeal of the various Emergency Ordinances. (EOs). However, it would be a strategic mistake to attribute the crime wave to the recent repeal of the EOs.
Petty criminals are not the only visible face of crime in Malaysia. Most of the biggest criminals in Malaysia wear suits, are chauffeur-driven around in luxury limousines and are in cahoots with criminals in uniform.
Five EOs were declared over the years to deal with these four “emergency situations”.
EOs were declared to deal with the threat of militant communism, to throw out the Stephen Kalong Ningkan Government in Sarawak, to throw out the Kelantan Government, and in the wake of the searing Sino-Malay race riots of May 13 in 1969 which erupted after the Opposition made dramatic gains in the General Election three days earlier.
EOs empowered even the lowliest cop to be King in the law of the Jungle
Malaysia is not unique in employing EOs as most of the Arab and Muslim World in particular is ruled by EOs.
Mubarak ruled for over 30 years in Egypt under emergency decrees and only repealed them after an uprising in the streets of Cairo called his bluff to drive him from power. Emergency decrees helped Mubarak win every presidential election with over 90 per cent of the votes cast. The Opposition was bludgeoned to death leaving only the tiny Muslim Brotherhood in place.
It’s a familiar story repeated in Malaysia.
The EOs gave Police enormous powers – even a lowly police inspector was King in resorting to the law of the jungle – to act against not only “criminals”, but those even thinking of committing a crime and politicians, among others.
The result was that the Police became trigger-happy, shooting first and asking questions later i.e. if the shooting victim was still alive. In most cases, the victims died while the police would invariably escape without so much as even a scratch. The fact is that the cowardly police, acting on so-called public tip-offs, would lie in ambush and murder their victims even before they had time to take out their weapons or machetes.
The police would turn in their standard performance at the perennial press conference to glory in details of their “close encounter” with the criminals now lying at the morgue. They would display money, weapons of all sorts, drugs and the like. God alone knows whether the evidence indeed came from the dead “suspects” or were planted by the police. No inquests were ever held and the Police didn’t believe in Internal Affairs querying those involved in shoot-outs.
Being trigger-happy was a short-cut method employed by the police, as with the police in Latin America who are noted for indulging in extra-judicial killings, to avoid having to go to Court and having to prove their case and at the same time “reduce the crime rate” by “wiping out criminals, suspects, and potential criminals”.
Trigger-happy cops saw no need to upgrade themselves
Suhakam, the Malaysian Human Rights Commission, only needs to go through the files on extra-judicial killings to realise the enormity of the police crimes against a defenceless civilian population. The perpetrators need to be brought to justice and made accountable for their crimes against human rights and human rights violations.
Being trigger-happy not only saved the Police from having to trudge between the Court and their cubicles at their bases, but they were blissfully content to wallow in ignorance and incompetence like “katak di bawah tempurung” (frogs under a coconut shell), seeing no need to acquire any crime-fighting skills of any sort or update themselves in general.
The Police have degenerated since the emergency years of 1948 to 1960 into an ill-equipped, ill-trained, zero-skills force of illiterates and semi-literates driven by queer notions on race and religion.
The EOs spared them the need to upgrade themselves all the time and as a result, stripped of the fig leaves provided by the repealed Ordinances, the Police stand naked now for all to see . . . unskilled, incompetent, unable to form their role of keeping the peace but not at any cost. So, it’s not surprising that the Police are blaming the repeal of the EOs for the crime wave going through the roof.
Underworld has links with the Police Force
Strangely, EOs were not used against the white collar criminals, the insider traders, the corrupt and those in the underworld who had links with elements in the Police force. There evidence is there in the foot-dragging by the Police on the underworld.
When the Police were not too busy murdering criminals in ambushes, they were equally busy in the lock-ups, beating the sh.t out of suspects to extract the so-called confession. Often, the Police did not know when and where to stop and many of their victims as a result ended up dead. That did not stop the Police from inventing stories on cases of alleged brutality and deaths in custody. They had any number of excuses to entertain the media or the Court when it came to that.
Indian youths have been a favourite target of the Police who belabour under the delusion that only this particular community is prone to crime.
The most infamous non-Indian example was then Deputy Prime Minister Anwar Ibrahim who was bashed up black and blue including being given a black eye by then Inspector General of Police Rahim Noor who went overboard to please then Prime Minister Mahathir Mohamad. Mahathir, embarrassed by Rahim Noor’s sycophancy, sheepishly claimed that Anwar probably either fell down in the police lock-up where he was being held or bashed himself up to garner public sympathy.
MACC no better
All the while, the Police like the Malaysian Anti Corruption Commission (MACC) seemed to be turning a blind eye to the bigger criminals who routinely raid the Public Treasury under the guise of bringing development to the people and line their pockets in the process.
Again, the Police are not entirely to blame for failing to deal entirely with the bigger crime wave in the country fostered by politicians and white collar criminals in suits.
The MACC, it must be stressed again, has been equally loathe to act against these big-time crooks despite having access to the global SWIFT and IBAN systems which can track money laundering activities.
Taib continues to live a charmed life in paradise
For example, MACC is yet to act against Sarawak Chief Minister Abdul Taib Mahmud despite the mountain of evidence available against him from SWIFT and IBAN. They don’t have to wait for exposes splashed by The Sarawak Report in London or the Bruno Manser Foundation in Switzerland.
Instead, the MACC has been busy with cases involving persons who time and again took a flying leap from their premises after interrogation sessions over petty amounts or petty corruption cases.
The bottomline is that both the Police and the MACC are beyond redemption due to the current political system where the top cops and MACC officers answer to the Umno-BN chiefs.
Taking a leaf from post-Saddam Hussein Iraq, both forces needs to be disbanded and a new multiracial force set up with UN help. This force, trained by the UN and international experts, can help fight commercial crimes as well and corruption.
Only a newly set-up Police force, well-trained and well-equipped, can help bring down the crime wave in the country and stamp out increasing criminalization of society.
In the interim period, the UN can provide a 50,000-strong International Police Force to keep the peace in Malaysia. There are precedents for this as in Timor Leste, Cambodia and elsewhere.
Those demobilized from the Police and the MACC should be barred from re-applying to join the new force.
Malaysia Chronicle

























Are we still assured of our security?

The recent three violent crimes committed in broad daylight in Kuching and four gruesome murders in Sibu have raised alarm among the general public of whether security in major towns in Sarawak is still intact.
The two high profile cases of a white-collared woman’s hand being chopped off in a public place and the case of an open shooting at high end residential area of Green Height, which remain unsolved, are still in the minds of the general public.
Long regarded as punching bag whenever there is a high profile crime, the Sarawak Police Commissioner Datuk Acryl Sani Abdullah Sani who is in office for only seven months, tells his side of the story to a senior reporter of The Borneo Post, Lian Cheng.
Sarawak is still overall a very safe place — Police chief

Acryl Sani
Q: How do you describe the crime situation in Sarawak in general?
Sarawak’s population is about 2.5 million and the land size is as big as the peninsular. Kuching only has a population of about 700,000; Sibu, 260,000; Miri, 300,000 and Bintulu 220,000, compared to some big towns which have an average population of 3 million. Here, we can almost say that everyone knows everyone.
Crime is categorised into two groups i.e. violent and property crime. In Sarawak, for the half year period of Jan-Jun 2012, a total of 5,092 criminal cases were reported.  The types of crimes here are predominantly property crime which constitutes 90 per cent (or 4,584 cases) of the total crimes reported. Theft (63 per cent) and break-in (27 per cent) cases constitute the majority of cases which we need to address.  As for serious crime, which makes up 10 per cent or 508 cases, the highest was recorded in Kuching (193 cases) followed by Miri (63 cases), Sibu (60 cases), Bintulu (47 cases) and the remaining 145 cases occurring in the other 23 districts throughout the state.
I am not trying to down play, but honestly I would say that overall Sarawak is still a very safe place.
Q:  It has been reported in the media that the crime rate is dropping.  However, there seems to be an increase in violent crimes.  Please comment.
Violent crimes comprise of murder, rape, robbery (with or without arms) which causes grievous hurt. From our statistics, for the period of Jan – June 2012 as compared to the same period last year, murder cases has increased by three cases or 18.7per cent from 16 cases last year to 19 cases this year.
Rape cases have increased by 18 cases or 26.4per cent i.e. from 68 to 86 cases reported this year. Still the overall
statistics show an overall violent crime drop of 7.64 per cent since there is a drop on the other category of violent crimes where robbery cases was down from 207 cases last year to 145 cases this year and causing grievous hurt down from 259 cases to 258 cases. Correspondingly, it is also interesting to note that there has been a drop of street crimes (snatch theft and all type of robbery without arms) by 51.85 per cent.
Statistics do not lie and we can’t manufacture false statistics. When a case is reported, there is an entry in the on-line police reporting system. No one can delete or manipulate that entry.
From Jan to June this year, there are three noted cases of violence in Kuching i.e. one murder and two cases of causing grievous hurt. As for Sibu there are four murder cases which were given wide coverage by the media.
Q:  Two or three violence cases may be considered okay for you, but for us we consider that ‘many’ and the public perception is that our security is no longer intact.
Then perhaps, from now on, I should refrain myself from referring to statistics as even when we tell you there is a drop, the public still don’t feel safe.
For me, this is all about individual’s perception and expectation since every time there is a case that attracts public interest is reported, people start talking that the crime rate has increased. And when data shows on the contrary, they say “we don’t feel safe anymore”.
So, when we talk about number of cases, how many is “many”?  What is the number to be accepted  the standard of safety?  Is it zero case? one case? or two cases?
When people said “many”, you are quantifying into numbers. When you talk about the Green Height Coffee shop shooting, it is one such case this year. And how many such cases last year?  or the year before?
As far as I know, this is the only shooting case in Kuching.  The last one happened more than 10 years ago.  As this kind of case seldom happened, of course people were shocked by it.  But certainly we shouldn’t be too excited to claim that we no longer feel safe.
And when we talk about this lady’s hand been chopped off, we have to look at her background.   She is just a regular person like us.  Perhaps, it was due to some reason that we are still investigating, someone finally decided to act against her.  Does that reflect a crime situation that is on the rise?  We must talk about practicality and reality.
The same thing seems to apply in the case where a man who was attacked by three masked persons in broad daylight when he was taking breakfast in one coffee shop at 11am.  From the style of attack in both cases, some said it involved gangsterism.  But based on the investigation so far we still could not see that there are elements of gangsterism involved.
Q:  Is the state of  security in Sarawak at present acceptable?
As I have said earlier, the overall situation is still very safe. We can still see people going out for dinner, cycling at night and doing many other activities. And if we look at the faces of people, we don’t see them showing any signs of worries, stress or jittery of becoming the next victim of crime.
Of course we all hope for an ideal situation.  Everybody wants and dreams a crime free society.  Like Martin Luther King once said “I have a dream…..”.
But is ours an ideal society?  Recently, I read in one of the leading newspaper carrying story about the Ugly Malaysians. The story relates how our society exhibit all behaviours uncalled for in a cultured society.  And we still have issues on how best to instil good mannerism in our students in schools (whether to rotan or not to rotan).
As much as I do not want to refer too much on statistics, still index crime for the period of January to June 2012 has dropped by 11.67per cent i.e. from a total 5,765 cases last year to 5,092 cases this year. Sarawak is generally a very safe place to stay.
Even though statistics have showed that security has improved, people still don’t feel secure.  As I said earlier, it is a matter of perception.
Q:  Why is perception unfavourable to the police?
Because the public keeps on focusing on crimes.  And when they talk about crime, they always relate either to their own experience or their friends’ or even their friends’ friends’ experience. But yet in reality, you don’t see people running around on the street crying for help because they have been chased after.
Q:  Perhaps people feel unsafe because most cases are not solved and the public has this perception that the police are ineffective.
That is why we no longer use this term “solving rate”.
“Solving rate” means the rate of cases deemed to have been solved after identifying the suspects.  For example, when we manage to find a stolen vehicle or identify a suspect, we consider case as solved even when the criminals or suspects are still not apprehended.
Nowadays, people see it as a very loose definition, which we have been using as the main reference to measure our achievements in managing criminal investigations.
But now, we have changed to use the term “charging rate” which is more challenging to achieve.
This year, our KPI is to achieve 25 per cent charging rate, meaning for every 10 cases investigated by the police, 2.5 cases must go to the court to be charged.  It makes us work harder. Next year, it will be 35 per cent.
Up to end of June, we have achieved 23.4 per cent of charging rate.
Q:  Let us zoom in to Sibu.  There have been many violent crimes in Sibu.  Are these crimes related to gangsterism?
Statistically in Sarawak, Sibu ranked third in term of number violent crimes reported after Kuching and Miri. Yes we can see for this year, from January to June, there are four murder cases and two out of the four cases have been charged in court. The two murder cases that have gone to the court were confirmed to have nothing to do with gangsterism.
The other two cases have yet to be solved.  The case of the murder of a banker in his house is suspected to be a break-in case gone foul.  But we are still investigating all possibilities.
The other unsolved case is the gunning down of a businessman from the back.  The case is still under investigation.
We understand that Sibu is a town with a relatively small population.  The residents find it hard to accept when these things happened, but we assure the people that it has nothing to do with gangsterism.
Q.  What is the percentage of crimes committed in the state are gangster-related?  Is gangster-related crime on the rise in Sarawak?
Any criminals when committing any crime of violence will definitely exhibit gangster-like behaviour, but then this kind of phenomena happens everywhere, not just in Sarawak or Sibu for that matter.
In fact, for Sarawak, gangster related cases amounted to only 0.002 per cent against the total number of crimes committed each year.
There has been no solid evidence of gangster-related crimes being on the rise in Sarawak.
Q:  What have been the steps taken to curb gangsterism in the state?
There are a few steps we have been taking which include profiling of every potential criminals, charging them in court should they been found to be committing crimes.
We also check on them from time to time to let them know that they are being watched.  And for the so-called active gang members, detectives have been assigned to monitor their movements and activities for any potential gangster-related activities.
Q:  Are the two cases of Green Height coffee shop shooting and the chopping off of the right hand of a woman gangster-related?
As I have said earlier our investigation so far has not revealed any elements of gangsterism.  We are still looking at several theories and at this point of time indications seemed to suggest at personal grudge.
Q:  Anyone from the public comes forth with information with regards to the shooting since it has been estimated that there were about 100 customers witnessing the scene then?
We have interviewed all of those who were there that day.  Investigation is still on-going and we appeal to members of public who has any information to come up and help the police.
Q:  How do you feel towards the negative perception the public have for the police – being inefficient and unable to solve cases, especially the high profile ones?
Yes, it is bad for us that just when we announced that crime rate was down, suddenly a person got her hand chopped off and of course with the way the media carried out the story will definitely convinced the people that the situation is critical.
Q:  Thus far, are you happy with the performance of the police?
Yes I must say that I am quite happy, but of course there are still rooms for improvement. We have to continuously remind our personnel that we must be seen to do our work.
You see, the most important thing for us is to be seen by the public.  We are expected to be seen on the road, patrolling the streets.  People want to see us in our uniform, doing our rounds.  And we need to do all these things 24hrs and seven days a week. They do not expect us to go to their backyard to snoop around.  The mere police presence makes people feel comfortable.  And I would say that criminals or perpetrators would think twice before they commit any wrong doings when we are around.
Q:  Despite constant police presence, there are still open shootings.  Do you think the criminals are challenging the police?
I don’t see it as the criminals challenging the police. I don’t think any criminals dare to challenge us. They just wait for their chances.
They know that the police cannot be everywhere 24 hours seven days a week.  The police have other places to take care of.
We cannot put police officers at all areas every time all the time.
Crime happens when the three basic elements are present i.e. intention, target and opportunity.
They wait for their opportunity when they have already a fixed target and intention.  Minus any one of these and crime will not happen.
Q:  What guns have the criminals been using and where are they from?
In all the shooting cases, we found out that shotguns and the likes are mostly used. Here in Sarawak shotguns and homemade guns are common for hunting.
The criminals do not use very sophisticated weaponry such as automatic pistols or high velocity rifles. If this has been the case, then there is a cause to worry.
We believe and from evidence gathered thus far the guns being used were either shotguns or homemade guns.



























Pakatan to include police reform in its budget

Syed Jaymal Zahiid | July 31, 2012
PAS secretary-general Mustafa Ali says crime is on the rise and the BN government is in denial.
KUALA LUMPUR: Pakatan Rakyat said today it will include plans to reform the police force in its 2013 shadow budget following criticism that the authorities have failed to tackle rising crime.
PAS secretary-general Mustafa Ali said this will include the redeployment of more officers to combat street crimes by reallocating at least half of the existing numbers used for internal security and public order.
Currently as many as 32,656 from the 105,000 officers in the force are designated for the two categories while only 9,346 are slotted for crime investigations which he said is key to decreasing crime.
He also noted that the police’s budget allocation for crime investigation had only increased by 8% annually in the past two years while internal security and public order had an overall increase of 72% in the same period.
“We have been analysing how the police has been performing its duties and found that most of the resources are not channelled towards fighting crime despite the negative perception that it is not doing its best to combat rising crime,” he told reporters here.
The country is now locked in a raging debate on the recent spate of street crimes including high-profile kidnappings and robbery but the authorities claimed statistics showed otherwise and blamed the nationwide panic on media sensationalisim.
Pemandu claimed data showed crime had dropped by 10% from January to May this year, the same period the supposed “crime wave” took place.
Opposition leaders alleged the statistics do not reflect the ground reality and accused the government of embellishing figures to gloss the Najib administration’s crime fighting initiative.
While defending the statistics, Home Minister Hishammuddin Hussein said the authorities must not dismiss public fear and step up efforts to beef up security.
Crime was one of the key policies introduced by Prime Minister Najib Tun Razak when he took office in 2009, a crucial election push for the unelected premier.
This could be the reason behind Pakatan’s move to include its police reform proposals in its Budget which is likely to be unveiled just before Najib table his in Parliament on Sept 28.
Mustafa revealed that the project will be spearheaded by former police CID chief Fauzi Shaari who joined PAS in May.
PKR vice-president Nurul Izzah Anwar at the same press conference said the reform would also take into account “the needs of the force” pertaining to crime fighting.



























Royal Malaysia Police response to ‘Why police are impotent’


CPI Intro: We are sharing with readers the response of Polis Diraja Malaysia (PDRM) to a commentary by Dr Lim Teck Ghee on “Why police are impotent in dealing with growing crime“(23 July 2012).
Interested readers are encouraged to send in their views on the various points raised by PDRM in defending the official crime statistics and the steps taken to combat crime.
********
By ACP Ramli Mohamed Yoosuf | Tuesday, 31 July 2012 16:39
CPI

There have been quite a number of debates lately on the issues of crime, particularly on the accuracy of official crime statistics and police efficiency in combating crime. Various articles and reports have been written with many quarters offering differing views. The Royal Malaysia Police (PDRM) have constantly been keeping the public abreast on the crime situation and police efforts in crime prevention. In this article, PDRM would like to clarify pertinent issues concerning crime and in particular respond to the article written by Dr. Lim Teck Ghee entitled “Why police are impotent in dealing with growing crime” in CPI website which was published on 23July 2012 .

Crime statistics released by the PDRM are the actual figures of criminal cases reported to and investigated by the police department. These figures are auto-generated by the department’s computer system, i.e. Police Reporting System (PRS). In this way, no alteration or adjustment to the figures can be done, in order to portray a rosy picture of the crime situation as claimed by certain quarters.
The process of lodging a police report starts with the complainant walk in to the Police Station and at the Enquiry Office the police personnel received the report and types it into the computer using the PRS. Then, the typed report is shown to the complainant for him/her to acknowledge it to be true and accurate. In case where he/she cannot read Bahasa Malaysia, the report is read to him/her and translated if possible. The complainant will then sign a copy of the report for acknowledgement. The PRS will then generate a police report number and the Officer-in-Charge of Police Station (OCS) classifies the complaint according to the nature of the report, whether it is of a civil or criminal category. The Officer Commanding Police District (OCPD) will subsequently re-check whether the report is appropriately classified.
The PRS is linked-up throughout the country and to the Contingent and Bukit Aman headquarters, Criminal Intelligence Units (URJ) at these HQ levels compile crime statistics periodically – daily, weekly, monthly, and so on.
Since the inception of the PRS, PDRM have stopped compiling crime statistics manually, thus the question of doctored figures should not arise at all. Dr. Lim may agree that while crime awareness have caused more victims to come forward to lodge reports for police investigation, there are instances crime goes unreported for reasons known to the victim. These are the so-called dark figures of crime. But so long as a case is reported and duly investigated, the public can be assured that it is reflected in the official crime statistics.
The PRS is monitored daily at the District, Contingent and Bukit Aman HQ levels. Senior officers at these levels regularly check the accuracy of the classification via the system itself. As a matter of fact, this practice is very important that disciplinary actions will be taken against those officers who failed to classify cases accordingly and those who refused or failed to take down a report will be dealt with disciplinary procedure.
In short, PDRM would like to assure and reassure the public that we do not resort to deceiving the public by playing tricks with crime figures. Obviously such wild and unfounded assumptions are against the interest of the police to serve the rakyat better. All crime data and statistics generated within the PDRM system have been audited and verified by Pricewaterhouse Coopers Malaysia (PwC). Therefore all figures presented by PDRM are valid and reliable in accordance with the standards of the professional auditors and not something of our own creation. In light of this, it is definitely not true to claim that the current crime rate is the highest we have ever seen. Based on crime statistics over the past ten years, the highest number of cases was recorded in 2008 with 211,645 cases.
With aggressive crime prevention measures taken by the current top leadership of the force, crime rates have been brought down in the subsequent years. The implementation of NKRA Crime Prevention initiatives, in particular, has successfully helped to reduce crime index to 177,520 in 2010 and 157,891 in 2011.
To gauge how the public feel about their safety and their confidence in the police service, PEMANDU has commissioned a private international company, TNS Research International to conduct a public opinion survey from December 2009 to date. The survey is conducted with a sample size of 1,212 respondents of age 18 and above who are randomly picked proportionately according to state distribution. The mode of survey is face-to-face interviews.
The latest survey results for the period January to December 2011 revealed that the public’s “fear of being a victim of crime” have increased marginally from 52% in January 2011 to 52.9% in December 2011. This slight increase could be attributed to the fact that some cases have generated more public interest, especially when they involved a “series” or “pattern” of specific crime such as fatal snatch-theft cases. The reports of such crimes have in turn formed public opinions on the “state of crime in the country”, hence registering an increase in the fear of becoming a victim.
On the other hand, the public satisfaction towards the performance of police service has shown a significant improvement, i.e., from 56.6% in January 2011 to 70.5% in December 2011.
In his article, Dr. Lim made some valid recommendations as to how to combat crime more effectively. In fact, numerous measures have been taken by PDRM to tackle the crime problems, including those mentioned by Dr Lim. First and foremost, the force always give the highest priority to tackling crime, right from the IGP to the lowest ranked police officers. We also welcome legitimate criticisms and recommendations that will help us improve.
The force is in the process of deploying more personnel to work on the ground through our “civilianization” exercise where desk works that are more clerical or administrative in nature are assigned to civilian staff, and the relieved uniformed personnel are transferred to the ground. In addition, all officers and men, including those who are office-based, are required to patrol the street under the NKRA initiatives. For instance, our latest “Omnipresence” crime prevention strategy was launched recently where 300 uniformed personnel from the ranks of Constables to Superintendent are deployed to 10 strategic locations in KL and PJ daily. This is on top of the regular beat and patrol duties carried out by the respective Police Station personnel.
With regard to the suggestion of Dr. Lim to take on the approach of Broken Windows, PDRM have similar projects called Program Gerakan Tumpuan (PGT) and Safe City Programme.
PGT has been implemented since 2005 with the objective to tackle social problems and crime, instill more values in the community and create greater rapport between residents and government agencies and non government organizations (NGO).
In this programme, efforts were focused on the operational and strategic standpoint of policing, where resources have been managed optimally with officers being redeployed to the streets. The combination of this redeployment of resources and new tactical initiatives have resulted in the early detection of crime in certain populated and business areas.
Some of the issues addressed under PGT are related to drugs, robbery and snatch thefts. The success of the PGT depended on the cooperation of the various organizations which has brought positive changes in areas of implementation. As a point of reference, a research conducted in the San Peng area by the National Institute of Public Administration (INTAN) in 2006 showed a decrease in social problems and crime in this area.
As for the Safe City Programme (SCP), it was approved by the government in 2004 with the main objective to help crime prevention especially in crime prone areas, specifically to free cities from destruction to properties and lives, like crime, theft and robbery; vandalism; social and moral problems; and accidents inside or outside buildings.
Under the SCP, 23 crime preventive measures have been introduced and installation of CCTVs at public spaces and crime prone areas have contributed to the reduction in snatch theft. CCTV locations to be identified by GIS mapping of crime prone areas and to be monitored by PDRM.
This programme has received a Special Achievement in Geographical Integrated Systems (GIS) Award by ESRI (A US based company specializing in project consultancy and implementation services) at the International User Conference in San Diego on 25th of July, 2012. The award was a form of recognition to the collaboration between PDRM and the respective agencies in implementing the Safe City Monitoring System.
In sum, we have no doubt the author (Dr Lim) has all the good intention in his penetrating observations, but regrettably they do not reflect the actual state of affairs of the various efforts and undertakings taken both by the government and PDRM to combat the ever changing landscape of crime and criminality. It is in this vigor PDRM is committed to relentlessly continuing to protect the life and property of Malaysians – 24/7; rain or shine. In the spirit of supportive and caring Malaysians, we know that this is possible.
signed
ACP Ramli Mohamed Yoosuf
Assistant Chief Inspector-General Secretariat
(Public Relations)
Bukit Aman
30 July 2012



























Why police are impotent: A response to PDRMLim Teck Ghee


August 03, 2012
AUG 3 — I thank the Polis Diraja Malaysia for the response to my commentary on why the police are impotent in fighting rising crime in the country.
Massaging of official statistics and reports
Firstly, with regard to the lengthy explanation on how the crime count statistics are generated, whilst the information is quite useful, it does not make a convincing case that the crime rate has dropped dramatically during the past three years.
I am sure that the police leadership — as with the ordinary man in the street — is aware that police reports generated through the official reporting system considerably understate the actual incidence of crime.
Furthermore, methodologies, definitions and categorisations vary from year to year. These changes, together with other forms of “massaging” (authorised and unauthorised) are the most likely explanations as to why there has been such a sharp fall in the reported crime statistics in the past three years compared with 2008.
With regard to the auditing of crime statistics and the commissioning of the public opinion survey on perceptions of safety and confidence in the police force, it will be important for the police to make available through its own website or in the PEMANDU website the full and unabridged audit and survey reports as PEMANDU’s responsibility apparently is to ensure that crime data are available, transparent and reliable.
Such a measure will help members of the public ascertain the quality and validity of the work done by these commissioned organisations. It is well known that auditors and commissioned survey organisations will fudge and do a less than professional or honest job, especially on sensitive, lucrative or renewable assignments.
Growing disbelief in official police data 
Many credible stakeholders have emerged to throw cold water on the crime reduction statistics. No less a figure than the former Inspector-General of Police, Musa Hassan (he was IGP until 2010), has commented that “the public needs to know the truth, there is no need to hide when it comes to crime’.
Besides taking into serious account the views of knowledgeable insiders such as Musa Hassan, the police should study various reports — including those produced by foreign governments and embassies with interests in the country — on rising crime in Malaysia. These are easily available through Google’s search engine.
Also accessible are the commentaries on the crime situation and public response in the Internet media. In this respect, IGP Ismail Omar’s recent appeal calling on the public not to rely on social media for crime data is a sorry reflection of the delusion in the police leadership on the credibility of “reliable and certified” official sources.
Malaysians do not trust the establishment mass media for good reason. The IGP’s statement — “[W]hy must we release data that can picture Malaysia as a country that is not safe? I hope such irresponsible reports will not be released on social media” — will simply reinforce the public’s distrust of the reporting and statistics on crime carried by the establishment media and compel them to rely on less prejudiced alternatives.
In fact, the police leadership will be doing themselves and the public a favour if they study carefully the many articles and hundreds of suggestions from concerned citizens on how to deal with the growing crime menace.
Many of these comments in websites such as Malaysiakini, The Malaysian Insider, Free Malaysia Today, Malaysia Chronicle, Malaysia Today, Malaysian Mirror and others are based on personal experience and reflect a deeply alienated and demoralised public. The recent three-part series by Malaysiakini reporter Aidila Razak, for example, provides a useful overview of some of the main concerns.
Translation of this public feedback from the social media into Bahasa Malaysia and made available to all police personnel through the police base notice boards on a regular basis will ensure that the police force can better understand the reasons for public concern on police performance.  
If such feedback is still to be disbelieved, why then the extraordinary growth of the personal security related industry and the mushrooming of thousands of private security-manned gated communities. They certainly do not point to a lessening public concern for personal security or of greater confidence in the police as indicated by PEMANDU or PDRM-commissioned surveys or audits.
They is clear evidence of the worsening crime situation.
Police political partisanship: Overdue reform  
My commentary had also pointed to the politicisation and partisanship of the police force — leadership really — as one of the root causes for its impotency. I can understand why no attempt was made in PDRM’s official response to rebut or refute this argument.
The latest reminder of how the police are being used by the ruling government to serve its political ends comes from ACP Mohd Sofian Md Makinuddin, during his talk to the Sarawak Dayak Graduates Association recently, in which he said:
“Now we are facing the threats of certain quarters who hide behind NGOs and use religion, race and society as their tools to influence the people.”
Further, he described “LGBT culture” and “street demonstrations” as “negative cultures” by “extremist groups”.
By acting as a mouthpiece of the home minister (earlier, he had also claimed that an opposition party was being infiltrated by terrorists), Mohd Sofian has further undermined the police force’s claim to political impartiality and neutrality.
Most Malaysians recognise the great difficulty of the police force in its attempt to break away from the stranglehold of partisan politics. However, to ignore this factor or to be silent on it would be a mistake especially since the public are not easily duped by the argument that the police are acting impartially and independently. It is imperative that within the police force, there should be a separate and standalone discussion of this issue which is long overdue for reform.
Politics aside, the great majority of Malaysians want a police force that is fair, trustworthy, efficient and effective. They will surely support the police in whatever it takes to reduce crime in the country.
That support — and respect — has to be earned the hard way. It cannot come from brandishing what in all probability are misleading statistics but by the redoubling of efforts to fight crime and to protect life and property; and by resistance to government attempts to use the police as its political lackey.
* Dr Lim Teck Ghee is CEO of the Centre for Policy Initiatives.
* This is the personal opinion of the writer or publication and does not necessarily represent the views of The Malaysian Insider.




























Malaysia IS BECOMING A VERY DANGEROUS PLACE SO...

BE VERY VERY CAREFUL.....

Three Saturdays ago, my brother Wooi Chi, who runs an insurance agency business from the 1st floor of a shop office in SS15 Subang Jaya, was alone in the office browsing through his emails.

At about 11 am, he heard a buzz at the magnetic-controlled door and what looks like a courier man peering through the glass door.

Since there was no other staff around, he got up and strode to the door and pressed the button to open the door.

Next thing he knew, two Indonesian men burst in and one of them with a parang started chopping him on the head.

He fell backwards and as the blood oozes out from his open wounds he lapsed into semi-consciousness.



























   




They rifled through his office, took away his I Phone, I Pad, notebook and his wallet.
It was over in about 5 minutes. And the blighters bolted.

With adrenalin pumping through his body he managed to stagger down a flight of stairs, wobbled another 7 shops away and sought help from BP Lab.
They administered first- aid and summoned an ambulance from Subang Hospital .  

Thank God for Good Samaritan at BP Lab and adroitness of the surgeon at the hospital, and after 104 stitches on the head, he survived.  

The attack was unprovoked, cold-blooded and brutal.

 This seems to be the latest technique used by robbers and snatch thieves:
To prevent victim from resisting or fight back, they clobber the victim first.

 The irony of the story is that my brother, who is also a lay pastor, feeds and provides shelter to the homeless, ex-drug addicts, ex-prostitutes (some of them are Indonesians) along Jalan Chow Kit and Tiong Nam in KL.
 Over the weekend I goggled “ How to avoid being mugged “ and “ Delay and Defence “ and checked with friends in the police force how best to survive in this concrete jungle of ours, where you are a prey and the predators are lurking out there.

 They are two main areas I would like to focus on, namely: when you arrive early or work late in the office and when you are walking to and from your car.
Here are the 4 Ds tips to survive: Delay, Detection, Deterrence and Defence

When You Are in the Office

 Lock the main door or your room door (Delay)

 Remember where are all the fire alarm and panic buttons located (Deterrence)

 Practice on the fire alarm and panic button (Deterrence)

 Look at the CCTV before leaving the office (Detection)

 Ask questions before opening the main door (Detection)

 Keep an umbrella next to you (Defence)

 When You Are Walking To and From your Car

 Walk with your colleagues (Deterrence)

 Don’t use your mobile phone and be alert (Detection)

 Don’t walk, but strode to and from your car (Deterrence)

 Look around before getting into or out of your car (Detection)

 Bring along an umbrella or tennis racquet (Defence)

 When you get into the car, the first thing to do is to lock your car (Delay)

 Carry a pepper spray in your hand, not in your handbag (Defence)
 










 























by Katelyn Khoo on Monday, July 30, 2012 at 12:16am ·
After a night of terror, I am very glad that God still take good care of us.

It was a Saturday (28/7/12), around 10 PM, my boyfriend – Kalvin and I were walking toward my house at Sea Park. Just as we were about to cross the road to my front gate, a Myvi (WQR 7577) drove quickly into the street, passed by us, reversed then stopped.

At this moment, 3 men (dark-skin, suspect Indians) quickly came down from the car. Two of the men were holding a Parang, while another one holds a big log. One man hurriedly came to grab me and put the Parang to my throat. He was skinny, dark-skin, wearing a baggy t-shirt and long jean, had a moustache, approximately 5'7", mid-20s. I was shivering. The man tried to pull my backpack, but he was not successful.

Then, he started to beat me using his Parang’s shank, while others circled Kalvin. Kalvin pushed them away in order to protect me. The guys shifted their attention to attack him. Another guy with the Parang slashed Kalvin’s head. Kalvin collapsed and I wanted to run to him, but the man that grabbed me pushes the Parang into my throat and instructed me “Don’t move! Shut up!” This time, he pulled my bag from the back and was successful. I fallen to the ground, and the others kicked Kalvin’s back. They quickly rushed back to their car then retreated.

I ran to hold Kalvin, he was bleeding badly. We crossed the road and both of us collapsed in front of my gate. My dad hurried rush Kalvin to the hospital, while my neighbor helped to lodge police report. Thankfully, Kalvin is alright. He was admitted into hospital for observation. Again, thankfully, there is no fraction in head, no concussion. He had 6 stitches on his head and another 5 stitches on his upper lips. He has been discharged and resting at home now. On the other hand, I had 6 long and short injuries on my neck but there are nothing compared to the injuries on Kalvin.

Today, when I’m sitting down and think about the incident again, it happened in spilt second, less than 5 minutes. To me, it’s like a terrible long nightmare. According to my neighbor uncle from what he heard from the policemen that came to inspect my house, we were not the first victims of this car (Myvi : WQR 7577) and this gang. When I made my report, I told the Police Officer that this was my second time within two months: I was snatched few months ago, and now, we were robbed.  We did not attempted to fight back but they were still hurting us. Is this country still safe? When we are hearing that the crime rate has reduced as compared to last year, but every now and then, we witness cases happening all around and it’s getting more and more violent. We were robbed almost in front of my house!

We never think it’s going to happen to us, anyone of us... and then it does. We never felt unsafe in my neighborhood until yesterday. We have Rukun Tetangga and police cars to ronda everyday, but these cases can still happened. I'm Blessed that they did not make further harm to any of us. Today, I’m alive and relatively well. By God’s grace, Kalvin is fine also. I thank God for keeping us to His arms. We need to make replacement for the things we lost. Our phone service is still not active, please wait for our further updates.

I’m sharing this story with everyone because I want everyone to be extra careful with their surroundings. Guys and girls, please DO NOT be off-guard, even you arrived at your gate. Watch out for each other. There are several things we can do to protect ourselves from crime. Please DO watch out for each other. Take care of each other. Don't take someone paranoia or fear lightly. Guys, please be a very gentleman to escort the girls home. Girls, please be very alert and very careful all the times. Life doesn't come with guarantees. Just know that smiling will brighten your face, laughter will brighten your day, and good people will make your life great... good morning everyone and be safe every time!


Kalvin's blood at the dooryard

Kalvin's stitches

My neck

We found the image of the Parang they used. This is the one. Be careful everyone!
























8:27AM Aug 7, 2012
iVICTIM While the police and government leaders were touting about the reduction in crime rate and blame the media for creating a perception that crime is rife, several Malaysiakini staff were having first-hand experiences as victims of crime just last month.

One of them was traumatised in a gang robbery, while three others suffered losses after their cars were either stolen or broken into.

Here are their personal accounts:

Website and communications executive Subendran Ravindran

I was robbed in the wee hours of July 24 near the Sime Darby Medical Centre in Subang Jaya by two men.

It happened at 1.28am as I was walking to a teh tarik stall near the Subang Business Centre in SS15 after visiting a relative at the emergency ward of the medical centre.

I saw two men standing about 60 metres away from me. As I walked past between them, one of them asked for directions to some place.

Then, all of a sudden, he grabbed my shirt collar with both hands. As I struggled, the other guy came towards me with I believed was a steel rod from a car jack.

Speaking in Tamil, they asked me to take off my clothes. I refused, despite them telling me to do so three times.

I was struggling to get out of the assailant's grasp and we were moving in circles, while the other stood by, ready to swing the steel rod at my head. They then demanded my wallet and handphone, which I refused to hand over. The guy holding my collar punched me on the face.

Just then, I spotted a car nearby, with two other men in it looking at us. A four-member gang, I thought, and decided it would make no sense to fight them. I gave in.

They grabbed my handphone and wallet - in which I had just RM30, my bank ATM card, MyKad and a few other personal things - and then dashed into the car which sped off.

I immediately made a police report. The car was a Proton Iswara, greyish or blue in colour and I'm certain about the number plate - BFY 5334.

My advice: Be more alert, especially when it is dark. And be mindful of cars with two or three men roaming around in a particular area. I could have avoided this if I did not assume that the two men who grabbed me were restaurant workers.

Journalist Lee Long Hui

My car was stolen from the outdoor car park at Stadium Melawati in Shah Alam between 8.30pm and 10.30pm on July 17 while I was watching an exhibition basketball match there.

NONEI had parked my second-hand Proton Waja, which I bought for RM20,000 no more than a month ago, at the outdoor car park. The Proton was my first-ever car and I got to love it very much.

As I walked back after the game, I noticed that the car park was very dark due to insufficient street lighting. I found my car missing, and I went straight to the police station to make a report.

Fortunately, 11 days later the police found my car abandoned in a residential area in Petaling Jaya. It was in very bad condition. The boot was severely dented, the left side mirror broken and there were scratches all over the car.

NONEHowever, the engine was intact and in fine condition. Nothing inside the car was taken and I have just filed the damages claim with my insurance company.

What also disappointed me greatly was that the investigating officer told me "there is no criminal case involved" as I got my car back.

Even if I had got my car back within two weeks, the police officer's attitude annoyed me - and the fact that the culprits are still out there and probably joking about the ‘joy ride' that they had with my car.

Senior videographer Tan Jiun Wuu

My car window was smashed on the night of July 24 as I was having dinner with a colleague at Old Klang Road and I lost my camera and video-shooting equipment costing more than RM10,000.

My colleague and I arrived at the Chinese food outlet around 9.30pm that day, driving there separately in our cars. We parked our cars back to back, beside a bus stop under a street lamp close to the shop.

NONEWe finished our meal an hour later and upon reaching the parking spot, we saw a few people inspecting my car. One man on a mountain bike told me that the front passenger seat window of the car was smashed.

He then showed me his police identity card, told me to lodge a report and left, saying he would be on the lookout for the thieves.

According to a witness at the bus stop, the theft happened five to 10 minutes before my colleague and I got back to our cars, and that it was done by a gang of four. One of them used his elbow to smash the window.

It was my carelessness for not bringing my equipment along. These were in a bag that I placed under the front passenger seat. The camera and other equipment belonging to Malaysiakini were gone. Besides these, nothing else was stolen.

The road was busy at that time and there were buses stopping frequently to drop and pick up passengers.

NONEAfter I made my police report, the officer who recorded my statement told me that even police cars, adorned with the police logo and all, have had their windows smashed and some of their equipment stolen.

He also showed me a device thugs use to detect electronic items kept inside cars. The China-made device is also used by the police as well and it can detect anything with a clock running in it, such as laptop and camera with a time feature, even if the main battery is removed.

The police officer advised me not to keep any electronic item in the car, even in the boot, because the device can easily detect them.

Assistant news editor Kuek Ser Kuang Keng

The rear passenger window was smashed on the night of July 5, while parked on Lorong Abdullah in Bangsar Utama, near the Malaysiakini office. However, the window remained intact because of the anti-theft security film on it.

Due to insufficient parking space in the area, many workers park their cars along the quiet road leading to the KTM quarters. There have been numerous car break-ins reported in the area - and it was my turn that night.

Fortunately, the glass window did not break through because of the tinted window security film, and so nothing inside was taken. And yes, luckily I do have windscreen insurance for my car.


Have you too been a recent victim of crime? We would like to hear your story. Please email your personal account to editor@malaysiakini.com.





















Victims tell of trauma in hospital


SERDANG: After enduring the trauma of being slashed by robbers at their house, a mother and her two sons claimed they faced another round of horror at Hospital Serdang where they sought treatment.
One of the brothers, who wished to be known only as Lim, 36, said he was covered with blood from multiple wounds on his head, right shoulder, arms and knee when he was rushed to the hospital at about 3.30am last Thursday.
He said the robbers, believed to be foreigners, had broken into their home at Taman Lestari Putra, about half-an-hour earlier and also slashed his mother, 61, and younger brother, 26.
“After the robbers escaped, my younger brother managed to drive us to the nearest hospital,” said Lim yesterday.
Lim said when they arrived at the emergency unit, they screamed for help to get the staff's attention.
“I had to climb onto a stretcher myself. I was in pain due to the deep cut on my knee, but the staff were talking about what they had for their meals that morning,” he said, adding that his wounds were only stitched up at about 8.30am.
Another brother, who went to the hospital to check on the injured, claimed the first group of six to seven hospital employees, who included doctors, did not know how to deal with the situation.
“They were discussing how to stitch a wound. They looked lost and even snapped photos of my brother's (Lim's) deep gashes on their mobile phones.
“I then asked to have them transferred to a private hospital but the hospital staff refused to grant permission for the use of an ambulance, although there were five parked outside,'' he said, adding that he then called for a private ambulance to take the injured to Assunta Hospital in Petaling Jaya.
At the hospital, he said a CT scan on Lim's head and MRI on his knee revealed a hairline fracture and torn ligaments, while his mother was also confirmed to have suffered a skull hairline fracture.
Lim and his mother were discharged on Monday, while his younger brother received outpatient treatment at the Assunta Hospital.
Hospital Serdang director Datuk Dr Ardi Awang, when contacted, said his staff had to be careful when dealing with assualt cases, but said there could have been communication problems.
“The patients were first attended to by housemen but a medical officer arrived at about 4am,” he said.
Dr Ardi added that Lim was first referred to the orthopaedic unit after an X-ray and referred back to the emergency unit at 8.30am.
Related Stories:
Family puts up fight with trio





















Cut down SB, FRU to focus on crime-fighting: ex-CID chief tells police

Harakahdaily, 08 August 2012
Aug 8: Former Bukit Aman CID director Fauzi Shaari has called on the police to cut back on the Special Branch and Federal Reserve Unit so that more manpower can be channeled towards fighting actual crime.

Speaking to news portal Malaysiakini, Fauzi, who headed the CID from 2005-2006, said the department was understaffed, adding that even during his tenure he felt that its manpower should have doubled.

"As it is, the CID looks like it is unable to handle the workload because there are too many investigations.

"So why can't we cut back on units such as the FRU, field and marine police," he was quoted as saying in an exclusive interview with the portal.

While acknowledging SB officers' job to gather intelligence in the interest of public order, Fauzi however pointed out that the situation in the country had now changed and the unit no longer needed high number of personnel.

"We have to admit that in the past, (the situation) was more serious and with more threats. But now, the people have changed a lot," said Fauzi, who joined PAS in May and who had also served as state police chief for Selangor and Sarawak.

It was recently revealed that despite a 28 per cent increase in the size of the police force over the past decade, only 8 percent of police personnel have been assigned for crime-related tasks.

Based on statistics provided by the Home ministry, DAP's Bukit Bendera member of parliament Liew Chin Tong lamented that only 9,346 of the total 105,929 uniformed police force were put under the CID.
Related:
More policemen, more allocation, but only 8% to fight crime






























In Malaysia, it's ok to rape a minor If you're a star?

"Public interest will not be served if (the rapist) was given a custodial sentence when he had a bright future .." 

Read this article and throw up!
08 August 2012 | last updated at 03:45PM
National bowler escapes custodial sentence for statutory rape
By V. Anbalagan
 PUTRAJAYA: A national bowler escaped custodial sentence for committing statutory rape with a 13-year-old girl three years ago.

The Court of Appeal yesterday allowed Noor Afizal Azizan's appeal against the High Court decision to sentence him to five years jail.

A three-man panel led by Court of Appeal president Tan Sri Raus Sharif substituted the jail term with a bound over for good behaviour for five years.

If Noor Afizal breached the order, his bailor will have to pay RM25,000.

Raus in his decision agreed with counsel Hisyam Teh Poh Teik, who represented Noor Afizal, that public interest would not be served if his client was given a custodial sentence when he had a bright future.

Hisyam said that Noor Afizal was 18 years old when the offence was committed.

The Sessions Court in Malacca bound over Noor Afizal for good behaviour on a RM25,000 bond for five years after he pleaded guilty to raping the girl at a hotel in Ayer Keroh, Malacca on June 5, 2009.

The Sessions Court, on July 5 last year, in binding him over considered several factors including that there was a consensual sexual relationship between him and the girl.

The public prosecutor successfully appealed to the High Court on Sept 20 last year and obtained a five year jail term.

Noor Afizal, now 21, represented Negeri Sembilan between 2004-2010 and at the same time he represented Malaysia in the National Youth Category for five years between 2004-2008.

He is expected to represent Kedah in several up-coming tournaments such as the KL International Open Championship 2012.

Deputy Public Prosecutor Nadia Hanim Mohd Tajuddin appeared for the prosecution.
Read more: National bowler escapes custodial sentence for statutory rape - Latest - New Straits Times


 http://www.nst.com.my/latest/national-bowler-escapes-custodial-sentence-for-statutory-rape-1.122386##ixzz22zaAHTCV
Consensual sex? Excuse me. The girl was 13 when she was raped by the man (who was 18 when the crime was committed). She would be 16 and still a minor today. What consensual sex?
So what is the message that YA Rauf Sharif is sending to us? That it is not ok for a loser to rape someone's little girl but it is OK if the rapist happens to be a fantastic bowler, a national star, someone with a bright future? 
What about the minor's future?






STATUTORY RAPE IS RAPE, NO?

As reported by national news agency Bernama yesterday, Noor Afizal Azizan escaped jail when the Appeallate Court allowed his appeal to restore the decision of a Sessions Court which bound him over for good behaviour for five years, in a sum of RM25,000 for statutory rape.

The three-member bench led by Court of Appeal president Raus Md Sharif unanimously set aside the five-year jail term imposed on Noor Afizal by the Malacca High Court in allowing the prosecution's appeal for an enhanced sentence.
Raus, in his decision, agreed with counsel Hisyam The Poh Teik that public interest would not be served if Noor Afizal was sent to jail as he had a bright future.

He is not even named in this Gemilang 2010 squad! Maybe his is just tapping on the door!

Bright future as defined by law or perception. We are told repeatedly that nobody is above the LAW. But this is Bolehland. YES!

What of the girl’s future?
This reminded me of what did happen to Guan Eng when he defended a young maiden also from Malacca. Dang!
The court failed to define “good behavior”….any suggestions?
More HERE.















In Malaysia, it's ok to rape a minor If you're a star?

With updates:
Child Rapist Walks Free? - The Mole
The  minds of Malaysian Netizens are boggled by the Court of Appeal's verdict. @klubbkiddkl, probably the most-followed journalist on Twitter, has started the hash tag #BrightFutureRapeOK to start a discussion among his 225,000 followers.
The Facebook movement against crime, MARAH, has also started a forum on the subject. It has over 10,000 members.
Read also: Anger and ire over court ruling on alleged rapist















Child rapist walks free?

Thursday, August 9, 2012
  • Noor Afizal Azizan
Noor Afizal's bound over for good behavior for raping a minor has caused an uproar (Graphics by Dayang Norazhar/The Mole)
KUALA LUMPUR : Is it OK to rape if you’re an athlete or a sportsman with a bright future?

That appears to be the question on the minds of Malaysians who are outraged with the Appeals Court’s decision to let off convicted rapist Noor Afizal Azizan with merely ‘a bound over for good behaviour’ sentence.

Noor Afizal who is a national bowler had earlier been sentenced to jail for five years by the Malacca High Court for raping a 13-year old girl in 2009.

The brunt of the criticism against the Appeal’s Court decision was targeted at President of the Court of Appeal Tan Sri Raus Sharif's reasoning for the latest decision on the rape case.

Raus led a three-man panel of judges who substituted Noor Afizal’s jail term with a bound over for good behaviour for five years .

Blogger Rocky Bru questioned the judgement stating  : “What consensual sex?”

Rocky said the girl was 13-years-old when the crime was committed three years ago and she would still be considered a minor today at 16-years-old.

So what is the message that Raus Sharif is sending us? That it is not ‘ok’ for a loser to rape’s someone little girl but it is ‘OK’ if the rapist happens to be a fantastic bowler, a national star, someone with a bright future?’’

“What about the minor’s future?’’ Rocky questioned.

Blogger Seademon also expressed his utter disgust with the court’s decision. He pointed that  Section 375 of the Malaysian Penal Code was explicit on the matter :

"A man is said to commit “rape” who, except in the case hereinafter excepted, has sexual intercourse with a woman under circumstances falling under any of the following descriptions: with or without her consent, when she is under sixteen years of age."

A comment by Anak Jati Perak in RockyBru’s posting read:

“Talk about stupidity, this judge takes the cake. A rape is a rape and the victim has to live the trauma time and again.

Just because the perpetrator has a bright future does not negate what he has done. What about the girl’s future? Is that not a consideration? Something is fundamentally wrong with this judgement. Can the Malaysian BAR raise this issue?”

Twitter users had also come out and expressed their dissatisfaction with the judgement some even suggested that Noor Afizal should be dropped from the national or state bowling squad. 

Journalist Joe Lee who tweets via @klubbkidd started a hastag #BrightFutureRapeOK which is blazing a trail in the micro-blogging site after RockyBru's harsh criticism of the Appeals Court decision.




Joe Lee @klubbkidd suggested: “Noor Afizal Azizan should be BANNED FOR LIFE from ever competing in competitive sport let alone represent Malaysia.’’

@Phuttz wrote : “Since Noor Afizal Azizan got off easy, why don’t we send the judges into jail instead, for being stupid, senile and not fit to be in court.’’

Susan Lankester @suelanks wrote : “Judges  who acquit Noor Afizal Azizan therefore is saying that it is okay to be a RAPIST! What’s happening to my country???

Lawyer Aizat Abdul Rahman, via @AizatAbRahman, tweeted that the decision was made at the Court of Appeal level, and it could be turned by the Federal Court.

However, Nadiah Khairi via @nadiahkhairi, viewed that the decision could have probably been made after the way Noor Afizal has been behaving since the incident happened.

Members of Facebook group called Malaysians Against Rape, Assault & Snatch (Marah), considered the judgement as misleading and unfair to the girl.

Don Kurian wrote on the Marah FB page: “How can the court make any exception," national bowler with a bright future!”, engaging in sex with a minor 13 years of age is rape regardless if she had given consent ... The law is the law, this will certainly make a laughing stock of our senior judiciary”

However, Vincent Brian Wong viewed that judiciary should not be blamed because this case as he said: “The boy is lucky coz (because)  he got a good lawyer and the judge know how to put it in words. Its not the law that is d problem, its d interpretation!”

On July 5 last year, the Sessions Court in binding him over considered several factors one of which that there was a consensual sexual relationship between him and the girl but the High Court overrturned the decision and imposed a 5 year jail sentence.

Would the Public Prosecutor be filing another appeal, to the Federal Court following this controversial Appeals Court verdict?

We, in The Mole, are certain that Malaysians would be watching this case very closely.
























Judge, alleged rapist dishonour nation

Mariam Mokhtar | August 10, 2012
Noor Afizal Azizan, the Malaysian tenpin bowler, fills Malaysians with disgust and so does the judge who let him off the hook.
COMMENT
One Malaysian Olympian manages to unite the whole country and does our nation proud with his true grit, his fighting spirit and his hard work, but another sportsman, Noor Afizal Azizan, the Malaysian tenpin bowler, fills Malaysians with disgust.
Noor Afizal allegedly raped a 13-year-old girl in a hotel room in Ayer Keroh, Malacca, on June 5.
On Aug 7, he escaped punishment when the Court of Appeal president Raus Md Sharif set aside the five-year jail term imposed on Noor Afizal and agreed with Noor Afizal’s counsel, Hisyam Teh Poh Teik, that public interest would not be served by a custodial sentence, as Noor Afizal showed great promise.
Nothing was said about the future prospects of the victim – the girl Noor Afizal raped.
Hisyam said that Noor Afizal was 18 when the offence was committed.
Again, they ignored the age of Noor Afizal’s victim. She was only 13 years old when she was raped.
Is this how the judiciary works in Malaysia? Do judges in the Court of Appeal set aside justice because the needs of the alleged rapist are more important? In this case, the allged rapist happens to be a national bowler and could win medals for the country.
What has the de facto Women, Family and Community Development Minister Najib Tun Razak to say about this?
What are the views of the de facto Law Minister Nazri Abdul Aziz?
What are the priorities of the appeal judges? Is their primary concern the winning of sporting events?
Did they think Noor Afizal should be left off lightly as this is his first offence? Did they think as a nationl athlete, he could bring “honour” to the country through sport?
Women have no recourse to justice
The actions of the Court of Appeal judges simply reinforce the views that women in Malaysia have no recourse to justice and that victims of rape are not important and their futures are not worth considering.
Around the world, sports personalities are required to behave. If they utter racist comments, they are hauled to court. If they misbehave on the pitch, they are banned and fined. If they commit rape, they are jailed. If they drive recklessly, their driving licences are taken away and they are put behind bars. If they are in possession of drugs, the punishment is severe.
Sports personalities are seen as role models for children and young people. Whatever they do, both on and off the pitch or court or bowling alley, is scrutinised by the rest of society.
Did the Court of Appeal judges stop to consider the consequences of their judgment? When people who are guilty of serious crimes are let off with a rap on the knuckles, then what is the message being conveyed to the public?
In Malaysia, young victims of rape wait a long time for their cases to be heard. If the government is serious about combating child sexual abuse, they should bring these cases to court quickly.
The child is growing and the effect of having to recall their unpleasant experiences can be devastating. When they are in their early teens, they are searching for their identity, and they are aware that they have become a victim of sex crime.
The cross-examination, to which they will be subjected, is detrimental to their pride. At this older age, they are more acutely embarrassed than when they were younger, and because of this, they may sometimes appear to be uncooperative.
Experts in the field have always maintained that the longer the case is dragged on, the better the outlook for the offender.
Noor Afizal allegedly raped his 13-year-old victim in 2009. In 2012, he was set free.
What of the girl? What of her future prospects? What of her educational future? What if she had become pregnant? Would he have married his victim and then divorced her, once he tired of her? As many Muslim men do.
Noor Afizal is praised as a tenpin bowling champion. He is probably funded by various sporting bodies to train and to go overseas for competitions.
And the girl? Who will help her deal with the long-term psychological and emotional trauma? Studies have shown that abused children grow into adults with suicidal tendencies and many other deleterious habits.
People who work with the victims of sex crimes allege that the offender often pleads guilty, just before the trial, to gain a lighter sentence. Was this the tactic employed by Noor Afizal, to escape a prison sentence?
Our judges have dented public confidence in the judiciary by failing to impose sentences that are seen as a deterrent.
The rape of a minor is statutory rape, whether or not it is concensual. What if the victim had been coerced or her life threatened?
Why is Malacca notorious for the rape of minors? What sort of justice can women get in Malaysia when it is alleged that even ministers and sports personalities can escape punishment just because of their position in society?
Mariam Mokhtar is a FMT columnist.
























She was 13. A 21-year-old man had sex with her. According to the Penal Code, sex with an under-aged girl is statutory rape. He pleaded guilty. Today he is free. All he has to do is fork out RM25,000 and be on his best behavior for the next five years.
This is the brief of a statutory rape case with an outrageous ruling.
Now, let's get to the details. The accused person is national tenpin bowling ace Noor Afizal Azizan.
Taking into account that he is a national champion, the Court of Appeal ruled that a jail term is not in public interest as Noor Afizal has a promising future.
This is shocking.
Can it be consensual with a kid?
When the case was first heard in the Sessions Court, the judge ruled that Noor Afizal must be bound by a five-year term for good behavior and slapped a penalty of RM25,000 on him.  But he also said that it was a consensual act.
Sex with a 13-year-old is consensual? Really? Bollocks. Whatever happened to going by the law?
When the prosecution appealed the case, the High Court ruled that Noor Afizal serves a five-year jail term. But semblance of justice for the victim, a child, remains elusive with the recent ruling.
It's difficult to comprehend the judgment, which can only be described as reckless. It has failed to take into account the abuse endured by the victim, the emotional, mental and physical well-being, not to mention a crushed future.
In short, the accused person has robbed the child off her childhood. I can only imagine her trauma.
Mentality of the judiciary
On a deeper level, the ruling reflects the state of judiciary in the country, which seem to signal that rapists can have a "Get out of Jail Free" token if they hold an important position in the society, have a great future, are famous and with a fat bank balance.
The judgment has endorsed rape and set a grotesque precedence. It has also clearly shown that the country's judicial system is incapable of delivering justice to victims, especially children.
What kind of a society are we becoming? What kind of values are we teaching our younger generation?
We live in an environment where sex between consenting adults are open to moral policing. We live in a society that is quick to condemn homosexuality and same sex marriage.
What do we have to say about this ruling? A ruling which has allowed a rapist to walk the streets free?
I call upon child rights advocates, human rights organizations, civil society members, media workers, lawmakers, senators and the public to denounce this judgment.
In coming together, we bring with us the hope that the child victim gets justice at the Federal Court.
I pledge solidarity with the victim's family throughout this ordeal.
Charles Santiago is Member of Parliament, Klang


























Frequency and brutality of rapes alarming

By All Women's Action Society | 08 June 2010 | Read [0] Comments | Print This Post Print This Post
ALL Women’s Action Society (Awam) is horrified by a report in The Star of a serial rapist who repeatedly assaulted six secondary school students over one year and used the mobile phone recordings of the rapes as threats. This comes barely a few weeks after shocking reports of the gang rape of a 14-year-old student in a school in Rawang by seven classmates.
The increasing frequency and brutality of rapes and other sex crimes is alarming. According to statistics, the number of reported rape cases since 2000 has tripled to 3,626 in 2009, doubling within the last five years alone. These do not include other forms of sexual assault such as incest.
Using these figures, and accounting for the under-reporting (only one in 10 cases of rape is reported), it is possible to surmise that in Malaysia, approximately one person is raped every 15 minutes.
These two cases also expose a frightening pattern: young girls and teenagers are the primary victims of sex crimes. In 2009, all reported rape victims were girls under 18 years of age. Of these, more than half were below 16. These show that the young are disproportionately vulnerable to rape and other forms of sexual assault.
The use of mobile phones and other devices is also frequently being abused for sexual exploitation.
We admire and commend the young survivors in these cases for having the courage to speak out on the assaults despite the fear of retaliation. These acts of bravery have directly resulted in the perpetrators being caught by the police.
If only entire communities and institutions would also follow suit. In the case of the Rawang gang rape, the entire community and school kept silent, allowing the violations, assaults and crimes to continue. According to Rawang assemblyperson Gan Pei Nei, no one came forward to file a complaint.
Worse, there are serious allegations that the Rawang school has been covering up cases of assault. These claims must be investigated, and if found guilty, the institution is complicit in the crimes and must be held accountable.
As the sites of these rapes were within and surrounding the schools, the institutions must be held responsible for the safety and well-being of the students under their care. Otherwise, justice will yet again not be served.
Haslinah Yacob
President
Awam

8 June 2010


______________________________



Malaysia sends the wrong signals about rapeBy R Mageswary

KUALA LUMPUR - They gang-raped a woman and then set her on fire, but after only five years in jail, five men are about to be free to walk the streets of Kuala Lumpur again. Just weeks ago, a 15-year-old ethnic Indian student was raped and murdered, prompting a bitter public outcry.

Malaysian society seems to be sending the wrong signals about rape, beginning with the laws that let off too easily those who commit such a crime to an attitude that it is all right for men to be aggressive while women must suffer in silence. Ivy Josiah of the Women's Aid Organization (WAO) put it succinctly: ''Rape is one issue this country has not dealt with properly.''

Women's groups say it is shocking enough that a predominantly Muslim nation like Malaysia is experiencing a rising number of rape cases. But they say it is all the more devastating to realize that authorities are doing little to prevent rapes and less to help the victims.

In 1996, there were 1,071 reported rape cases in Malaysia. This grew to 1,323 the next year, and the upward trend looks to be continuing. In the past four months, the local media have been reporting at least one sexual assault a day. Last month, a woman and her daughter were raped by her 41-year-old son-in-law. A Dutch tourist was gang-raped at a rubber estate.

Activists concede that media coverage and the consequent rise in public awareness are encouraging more and more women to report sexual attacks. This may help explain the increase in recorded rape cases, they say. But they also note that for every 10 rape cases, nine go unreported.

Part of the reason for under-reporting lies in legislation. Local legal advocates have long had problems with the laws pertaining to rapists and other sexual offenders. They point out that the sentences meted out to those found guilty are too light, with a rapist getting only a whipping and a maximum prison sentence of just five years. Also, there is the question of definition. Under Malaysian law, rape occurs only when a man forcefully penetrates a woman's sexual organ with his penis. Using another object such as bottle or a stick, therefore, does not constitute rape.

Non-government organizations have been clamoring for years for the act covering rape and other sexual assaults to be amended. The last time a change in the law was made, however, was in 1989, when it was deemed that a victim's past history could not be brought up to defame her.

Women's groups, however, stop short of asking for the death penalty for those found guilty of rape. They fear this punishment would prevent incest survivors especially from reporting abuse, since they may not want the blood of their fathers or other relatives on their hands.

These days, the All Women's Action Society (AWAM) is asking for the abolition of the stipulation on corroborative evidence such as physical injuries in rape cases. It also wants compensation for rape survivors. At the same time, though, AWAM and other women's groups say whatever is lacking in the law is but a reflection of the flawed societal attitudes regarding rape, its perpetrators and their victims.

AWAM researcher Ong Julynn, for instance, rues the fact that there is high tolerance for men who go around bragging about their sexual prowess, which they equate with being ''real men''. She adds, ''Masculinity allows aggression, which leads to rape. There is a thin line between the two.''

Noted WAO's Josiah: ''In cases of violence against women, be it in the form of rape, physical abuse or sexual harassment, women are told to be silent.'' But she says this does not stop people from looking with contempt at a woman who has been raped ''because losing her virginity carries a social stigma''. These double standards largely explain the prevailing insensitivity of even authorities and health workers toward rape victims.

(Inter Press Service)










______________________________










Annual rape cases in Malaysia doubled from 2003

Wed, May 06, 2009

The Star/Asia News Network

  

By Winnie Yeoh
GEORGE TOWN, MALAYSIA: The number of rape cases reported in the country doubled from 2003 to 2007.
According to studies, there were 1,479 cases in 2003, but this rose to 3,098 four years later.


                      
        "What is worrying is that the figures only represent the number of cases reported. Most rapes cases went unreported.
"Experience tells us that only one out of 20 victims is willing to report her case," said Women's Centre for Change (WCC) Penang programme director Dr D. Prema.
She was speaking at the "Understanding and Supporting Rape Survivors" seminar at Penang Hospital Wednesday.
She said another area of concern was the prosecution of rape cases.
"We analysed 439 sexual crime cases tried in the Penang courts between 2000 and 2004, and found 137 cases pleaded guilty," she said.
She said that 198 cases ended in a discharged, not amounting to acquittal, verdict.
"Out of the 118 rape cases which went on full trial, only seven rape cases and six statutory rape cases were convicted," she said.
Dr Prema said WCC hoped different agencies could work to strengthen an integrated inter-agency approach to support rape victims.
"WCC is aware of the difficulties and challenges in reporting, investigating and prosecuting sexual crimes.
"We believe that support for rape victims must cover both physical and emotional recovery as well as access to justice," she said.
She also said WCC began collaboration with the emergency department of Penang Hospital from April 2008 to provide support for rape victims when they went to the One Stop Crisis Centre for assistance.
Centre executive director Loh Cheng Kooi said the seminar was aimed at building a better understanding of the situation and the rights of rape survivors.
The seminar saw 200 participants, comprising medical personnel, welfare officers, police officers and state prosecutors.
It was jointly organised by Penang State Health Department and Penang Hospital.
-The Star/Asia News Network




Websites - http://www.thenutgraph.com/







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http://www.state.gov/g/drl/






 http://www.atimes.com/se-asia/






http://www.asiaone.com/News/







 









 Tragedies after Tragedies...........Corrupted GOVT Never learns.........At what cost? Many innocent lives are at stake...... DO THEY EVER care? OVER THE YEARS 1000'S & 1000's DIED Needlessly under the watch of the Corrupted BN/UMNO GOVT!

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