Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Abbott has a lot on his plate when he comes to Malaysia Saturday 6th Sep 2014

Abbott has a lot on his plate when he comes to Malaysia Saturday 6th Sep 2014

 

KUALA LUMPUR: Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott will have more than just strategic interests in mind when he arrives in Malaysia on Saturday.
His official engagements include an address to the Malaysia-Australia Business Council and promoting The New Colombo Plan, his Government’s new initiative to foster closer educational ties between Australia and the Asia-Pacific.
However, of greater significance will be Abbott’s updates on the prolonged and frantic search exercise for Malaysia Airlines MH370 over the vast southern Indian Ocean.
His day trip comes on the heels of a memorandum of understanding signed between Australia and Malaysia to share the estimated A$52mil (RM153.4mil) cost to unlock what has been termed “modern aviation’s greatest mystery”.
Months of searches have failed to turn up any trace of the missing Boeing 777 aircraft carrying 239 passengers and crew, which disappeared on March 8, shortly after taking off from Kuala Lumpur for Beijing.
Abbott, who met Datuk Seri Najib Tun Razak in Perth during the initial phase of the search operations in April, will brief his Malaysian counterpart on the new search phase, which is expected to take up to a year. It will focus on a 60,000 sq km patch of sea floor some 1,600km from Perth.
“Australia’s defence ties with Malaysia are among the closest in South-East Asia and we feel a deep connection to Malaysia, given shared experiences arising from the MH370 and MH17 disasters,” said Abbott in Canberra.
“Hundreds of thousands of Ma­­laysians have studied in Australia and we will soon see more Australians travelling the other way when Malaysia joins the New Colombo Plan in 2015,” he said.
Under the A$100mil (RM292mil) Plan, Australian students underta­king an undergraduate degree in their universities will be able to apply for grants and scholarships to study in Asia-Pacific.
Malaysia and Australia were both beneficiaries of the historic scholarship scheme administered by the original Colombo Plan, which saw over 20,000 young students from around the region study in Australia from the 1950s to the mid-1980s.











 http://www.thestar.com.my/News/Nation/2014/09/02/Abbott-has-a-lot-on-his-plate-when-he-comes-to-Malaysia/





























































































Tony Abbott to visit India and Malaysia ahead of G20

National Affairs Editor
Canberra
TONY Abbott will visit India and Malaysia next week as he seeks to boost trade and personal relationships with international leaders ahead of the G20 in Brisbane in November.
The Prime Minister announced today he would visit New Delhi and India’s financial capital Mumbai “to strengthen the strategic partnership between our two countries’’.
“Australia and India have strong and growing economic and trade ties,’’ Mr Abbott said.
“India is Australia’s fifth largest export market, with total exports of $11.4 billion, and there is potential for further cooperation in resources, science, technology and education,’’ Mr Abbott said.
The Prime Minister, who will be accompanied by a group of senior business leaders, will spend Thursday and Friday in India and Saturday in Malaysia.
Mr Abbott said his visit would be an opportunity to engage with Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi early in the term of his government to increase bilateral cooperation.
The visit would also be an opportunity to talk trade and investment and promote Australia’s G20 objectives ahead of the Brisbane summit in November.
In Malaysia, Mr Abbott will meet with Prime Minister Najib Razak.
“Australia’s defence ties with Malaysia are amongst our closest in South East Asia and we feel a deep connection to Malaysia given shared experiences arising from the MH370 and MH17 disasters,’’ Mr Abbott said.
He said trade with Malaysia had grown, with two-way trade last year worth almost $18 billion.
“Hundreds of thousands of Malaysians have studied in Australia and we will soon see more Australians travelling the other way when Malaysia joins the New Colombo Plan in 2015,’’ Mr Abbott said.
He said he would return to Australia on Sunday week.










 http://www.theaustralian.com.au/national-affairs/tony-abbott-to-visit-india-and-malaysia-ahead-of-g20/story-fn59niix-1227041156489








































Tony Abbott: Don’t Migrate Unless You’re On ‘Team Australia’ 

 

 

 

 

Tony Abbott: Don’t Migrate Unless You’re On ‘Team Australia’

Prime Minister Tony Abbott says migrants had to be on ‘Team Australia and warned all citizens to be vigilant to the threat of home-grown terrorism. Pic: www.smh.com.auPrime Minister Tony Abbott says migrants had to be on ‘Team Australia and warned all citizens to be vigilant to the threat of home-grown terrorism. Pic: www.smh.com.auSYDNEY: Prime Minister Tony Abbott today said migrants had to be on “Team Australia”, and warned all citizens to be vigilant to the threat of home-grown terrorism.
Abbott’s government is hardening its terror laws to make it more difficult for Islamic extremists to travel from Australia to fight in places such as Iraq and Syria and easier to arrest them on their return.
“We’ve got a serious problem of radicalised people going to the Middle East to fight with terrorist groups,” he told Sydney radio station 2GB.
“Some of them will want to come back to Australia and they do pose a risk if they do, because they’ve been radicalised, militarised and brutalised by the experience.”
As many as 150 Australians are said to be fighting alongside militants overseas, including at least one Sydney man and his young son who have posed for photos with a severed head.
Abbott said that of the Australian residents who had fought alongside insurgents in Afghanistan, about two-thirds became involved in plotting terrorist acts on their return.
“So, we do have to be vigilant against it and my position is that everyone has got to be on ‘Team Australia’,” he said, referring to a catchphrase he used when introducing the terror laws this month.
“Everyone has got to put this country, its interests, its values and its people first, and you don’t migrate to this country unless you want to join our team.”
Asked what should be done if someone was found to be flying the flag of a terrorist organisation at their shop or home, Abbott said: “I don’t know what the legal position is but frankly the only flag that should be flying is the Australian national flag.”
The prime minister, who was meeting with Muslim community leaders in western Sydney today, stressed that Australian society was made up people from diverse ethnic and religious backgrounds.
“It’s important that individual communities can’t be caricatured on the basis of a militant few rather than on the basis of what I take to be a sensible majority,” he said.
The counter-terror legislation under preparation will make it easier to identify, charge and prosecute people who have been engaged in terrorist activities overseas, and prevent extremists departing.
But some Muslim groups have questioned the reach of the laws, which will also make it an offence to travel without a valid reason to a so-called designated area, as nominated by intelligence agencies. 
— AFP 



















































































































Australia Polls: The Mysterious Mr Abbott 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia Polls: The Mysterious Mr Abbott 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Australia Polls: The Mysterious Mr Abbott 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 http://mybaru1.blogspot.com/2013/09/australia-polls-mysterious-mr-abbott_9.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aussies! Will you be voting on Saturday 7th September 2013?

 

 

 

 

 

Aussies! Will you be voting on Saturday 7th September 2013?

 

 

 

 

 

 

Aussies! Will you be voting on Saturday 7th September 2013?

 

 

 

 

 

 


               Aussies! Will you be voting on Saturday 7th September 2013?


"Happy Voting!"




Australian PM announces new elections for September 7


http://edition.cnn.com/2013/08/04/world/asia/australia-election



By Holly Yan, CNN
August 4, 2013 -- Updated 0832 GMT (1632 HKT)
Australia's Prime Minister Kevin Rudd addresses the media after calling a general election in Canberra on August 4, 2013.

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd announced Sunday that national elections will take place September 7
Rudd challenged Gillard for leadership of the Labor Party and won a 57-45

(CNN) -- Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd announced Sunday that national elections will take place September 7.
It'll mark yet another turn in Australian politics. In June, Rudd returned as prime minister of Australia -- three years after he was replaced in the office by his then-deputy Julia Gillard.
Rudd challenged Gillard for leadership of the Labor Party and won a 57-45 vote among fellow Labor members of parliament.



Elections in Australia


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elections_in_Australia


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Australian federal election, 2013


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Australian_federal_election,_2013

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia


When?

Election day is Saturday 7 September 2013


http://www.aec.gov.au/

Polling places open at 8am and close at 6pm sharp.


Opinion: The Oz Asylum Seeker Racket



http://mybaru1.blogspot.com/2013/08/opinion-oz-asylum-seeker-racket.html




Opinion: The Oz Asylum Seeker Racket



http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/08/opinion-oz-asylum-seeker-racket_14.html
 http://bizgenerationnetwork.blogspot.com/2013/09/aussies-will-you-be-voting-on-saturday.html

Bigger brain drain as Australia relaxes visa policy, Guan Eng warns 

 

 

 

 

 

 





June 18, 2012

Lim today said Malaysian students in Australia will be more tempted to stay on and seek employment as they could potentially draw higher salaries, and enjoy greater freedom, a better life and better career prospects. — file pic
KUALA LUMPUR, June 18 — Malaysia could see a bigger brain drain to Australia next year unless Putrajaya enacts a full meritocracy policy, the DAP’s Lim Guan Eng warned today. The opposition leader was referring to news reports that Canberra is relaxing its visa policy to allow Australia’s massive 220,000 foreign student graduates to stay on and work in the country for up to four years after graduation.
“This would potentially allow all 220,000 foreign university students in Australia to work in any job once they graduate,” the DAP secretary-general said in a statement today.
Lim estimated there are some 20,000 to 30,000 Malaysian students in Australia and added that they will be more tempted to stay on and seek employment as they could potentially draw higher salaries, and enjoy greater freedom and a better life and better career prospects.
Australia is among the top higher education destinations for Malaysians to study abroad, besides the UK and the US.
“Why is it that the Australian government is able to be so proactive and quick to grab opportunities while our own government is so lackadaisical and merely standing by as droves and droves of Malaysian talent continue to leak out of the country?” Lim asked.
The Bagan MP pointed out that Talent Corporation, the state agency set up to resolve the brain drain problem, has managed to woo home only 680 professionals from abroad since it was formed last year and another 400 professionals in the first quarter of this year.
Lim questioned whether the paltry number of returnees could compare to the “tens of thousands” who are likely to make Australia their home after completing their studies, especially with the national deficit for 2012 likely to hike up to RM59.7 billion following the ruling Barisan Nasional (BN) government’s increased Budget for next year.
The fact is that until and unless we shatter the glass ceiling … we will never be able to attain the fabled high-income status that the prime minister is shouting about. — Lim Guan Eng
“The fact is that until and unless we shatter the glass ceiling by addressing the fundamental flaws in our country with regards to its failed policies of rewarding mediocrity over meritocracy, we will never be able to attain the fabled high-income status that the prime minister is shouting about,” Lim, who is also Penang Chief Minister, said.
A brain drain is depriving Malaysia of talent, and accounts for a third of the country’s million-strong diaspora, according to the World Bank Economic Monitor.
Singapore alone has absorbed 57 per cent of these departing educated workers.
Only 23 per cent of Malaysia’s current workforce is highly skilled and Prime Minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak has said this number must rise to 37 per cent by 2015 if it is to become a developed nation by 2020.
Malaysia’s slowing economy, which recorded a third consecutive quarterly dip in growth to 4.7 per cent in the first three months of the year, has raised questions of whether the federal government can keep spending in check.
Analysts have warned Malaysia to brace for a significant slowdown here due to rising linkages with top trade partners including China, the world’s second-largest market which economists say is headed for a sixth consecutive quarterly drop in growth with worse to come.
A Greek exit from the euro zone would cause a second recession in as little as four years in Malaysia as the knock-on damage to Europe poses a threat to the global economy, Bloomberg reported analysts and economists as saying recently.
The World Bank has also urged Malaysia to expedite reforms such as subsidy cuts and broadening the tax base, key initiatives that have stalled ahead of an impending federal election, if it wants to achieve Putrajaya’s target of being a high-income economy by 2020.

















Our choices: Emigration, encampment or engagement ― Thomas Fann



























Govt can’t stop brain drain

Patrick Lee | March 27, 2012
If people want to leave Malaysia for better careers or way of life, they're more than welcome to do so.
KUALA LUMPUR: No government can stop anyone from leaving for greener pastures. Minister in the Prime Minister’s Department Nor Mohamed Yakcop told the Dewan Rakyat this while answering a question on Malaysia’s brain drain problem.
“This is a world without borders. No government can stop those with the desire and the capability to migrate to other countries for better careers,” he said.
Citing the World Bank’s view on the matter, Nor Mohamed said: “Brain drain is a wave to be ridden, and not a tide to be turned.”
He said that the government shared this view, and that it was trying to use brain drain to its benefit.
Nor Mohamed added that migration was not necessarily a bad thing as it gave the country a chance to attract highly skilled Malaysians to come back home.
It, he added, also gave the country the ability to create a “market network”, promoting Malaysia abroad.
Nor Mohamed was responding to a query by Bagan MP (DAP) Lim Guan Eng, who asked why former Petronas chief executive officer (CEO) Hassan Merican was let go to join a Singaporean company in 2010.
Lim, who is also Penang Chief Minister, asked if Hassan’s leaving was a “blow” to the government’s efforts in bringing the Malaysian diaspora – now numbering more than one million – back.
He also asked how successful Talent Corp – the government agency set up to do this- was in doing this, and how much it had spent thus far.
Lim pointed out that Malaysia was losing highly-skilled workers and gaining low-skilled ones in the process.
Though evasive on the amount spent, Nor Mohamed said that the response to Talent Corp’s Returning Expert Programme was “encouraging”.
He said that in 2011, the agency brought back 680 people, double that of 2010 (313).
Globalised Malaysian
Nor Mohamed also acknowledged Hassan’s contribution to the country, and proceeded to commend the latter as a globalised Malaysian.
Hassan’s position, he added, would help strengthen relations between Malaysia and Singapore.
Nor Mohamed then took a swipe at Lim for asking about Hassan’s Singaporean decision, adding that Lim had in 2008, attacked Hassan (and other Petronas directors) for wasting money.
In 2008, Lim accused Petronas directors of living like kings and wasting money on items such as private jets and luxury cars.
Hassan left Petronas in February 2010, and has since accepted several director positions with foreign energy firms. He was appointed as a director with Singapore’s SembCorp Industries in June 2010.

















Our choices: Emigration, encampment or engagement ― Thomas Fann



























The migrant’s eye — Shaun Tan

 

 

 
Malaysia has a lot going for it. It has much untapped potential. It is devoid of natural disasters and rich in natural resources. It is a country with warm weather, amazing food and hot women. Its people are generally warm, friendly, and (with certain exceptions like yours truly) humble. Pull-factors like these would require considerable push-factors to trigger mass emigration.


But there’s a darker side. A side behind the strained tranquillity and Malaysia Truly Asia adverts. Since its independence in 1957, Malaysia has been run by the Barisan National (BN) party, and its regime is an autocracy that institutionalises racism. Non-Malays, including the ethnic Chinese and Indian minorities, are discriminated against in favour of the majority Malays, whose support BN depends on. Malaysian laws make non-Malays pay higher prices for certain goods and services, allocate them only a small percentage of places in public universities, and impose significant barriers against their advancement in the military, police force, civil service, and in government-owned companies. The BN government persecutes minority religions, and major Malay politicians often refer to Chinese and Indian Malaysians as pendatang (immigrants), of inferior status, while the current Prime Minister Najib Razak is alleged to have threatened to “bathe a keris dagger with Chinese blood”.


The BN government is also very protectionist, making it even more difficult for international companies to set up business there, for example, international law firms can only operate in Malaysia by acting in partnership with a local firm. Furthermore, the BN government is both grossly incompetent and highly corrupt. Billions of dollars in public funds are squandered on cronyism [20] and ill-conceived mega-projects [21], instead of being properly used to develop the country. The judiciary is largely comprised of underqualified yes-men, the police force is unreliable, and the public schools and universities are of low standard, such that even Malaysia’s top university, University Malaya, has dropped out of the top 200 universities in the world on all major rankings. [22]


This is why loving parents tell their children not to come home. They don’t want their children to live as second-class citizens in Malaysia, where their ambitions will be limited by institutional inefficiency, where they will be passed over for promotion in favour of others, not for any lack of skill, but for the colour of their skin. “Money does have a significant role but the most important factor… is opportunity,” outlined Wan Saiful Wan Jan, founding chief executive member of the Institute for Democracy and Economic Affairs. “Malaysia is too politicised and opportunities are not evenly available to everyone.” [23]


This is why Malaysians flock to Singapore, not because Singapore’s government is less despotic (it is even more so), but because the Singaporean government at least prizes efficiency, and recognises merit regardless of race. When a Malaysian renounces his citizenship, he doesn’t see it as an unpatriotic betrayal, he sees it as washing his hands off a regime that has marginalised and persecuted him. As one Malaysian, Wan Jon Yew, explained: “I’m not proud of being a Malaysian because I think the government doesn’t treat me as a Malaysian.” [24] Migration is beneficial because it increases efficiency; it allows young Malaysians to move to take their best offers, to move to where their ability is truly valued. A mind is a terrible thing to waste, and migration helps to reduce this wastage.


Not all Malaysians mass-emigrating are Chinese and Indians. Many Malays are emigrating too. Although they do not face racial persecution, many of their reasons for doing so are the same as those of non-Malays: the corrupt and inefficient system, the lack of security and religious freedom, the quashing of free expression, human rights abuses. Furthermore, Malays face a different form of religious persecution — forced piety by the overzealous Islamic moral police. Non-Muslim Malays and Malay homosexuals are jailed or sent to “re-education centres” [25], and earlier this year 80 Malays were arrested for celebrating Valentine’s Day [26]. In light of this, Malaysia deserves to lose the talents of its young people. It doesn’t appreciate these talents; it punishes its best citizens — those brave enough to stand up for themselves, or those too principled to fake devotion to a religion they don’t believe in — and instead it rewards its worst elements — the religious extremist, the racist, the snivelling sycophant. In a sense, we as Malaysian citizens deserve to lose the benefits those talents would have brought, because through our participation or collective inaction we allow this wretched state of affairs to continue. Migration is beneficial because it allows Malaysians to leave, and to live in a country that accords them the dignity commensurate with their status as a human being.













The Open Door
The ability to migrate presents young Malaysians with an open door to the rest of the world. This is not without its drawbacks. Many of the Malaysian émigrés leave not because they are weak or cowardly, but because they are ambitious, or because they are uncompromising — they refused to take orders from those who are their inferiors, or to remain party to a system that is morally indefensible. One cannot help but imagine how much good such spirit could have done if they had no choice but to remain in Malaysia. Not necessarily by engaging in overtly political activities, but by simple apolitical acts — by living their lives in their own way, free from compromise, and refusing to curb their ambitions. As Vaclav Havel explained in his book “The Power of the Powerless”, such simple acts are often the most potent weapons against oppressive regimes. Thus, migration has its drawbacks — it makes it harder for Malaysia to achieve real change because it takes away some of its most spirited people.

However there are also many young Malaysians who choose to return, and who seek to bring real change to the country. People like Nathaniel Tan — a Harvard graduate, who writes books exposing the abuses of the BN regime, even if his efforts meet with harassment and detention. Or Alea Nasihin — a friend of mine, and a student at Nottingham University, who resolves to return to work as a human rights lawyer. [27] Or myself. For us the open door is comforting. It gives us the courage to say or do things we might otherwise be wary of. Because it reminds us that there are limits to what an oppressive government can do. Because we know that even if our efforts harm our careers in Malaysia, even if the BN government hounds us and bars us from getting a job at any major company in Malaysia, there will always be many other places eager for our talents. It allows us to take more risks and dare greater things. The open door presented by migration therefore simultaneously hinders and helps the process of change in Malaysia.











The migrant’s eye — Shaun Tan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia-born online retailer among Australia’s most influential

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Malaysia-born Ren Ng is revolutionising photography with his Lytro light-field camera.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 http://mybaru1.blogspot.com/2012/10/bigger-brain-drain-as-australia-relaxes.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

REPORT: Home Minister Accuses Non-Malays Of Being Arrogant







REPORT: Home Minister Accuses Non-Malays Of Being Arrogant


Source: Roslan Rahman, AFP/Getty ImagesROSLAN RAHMAN/AFP/GettyImages
Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi has accused Malaysia’s ethnic minorities of becoming increasingly insolent to the point of disrespecting the nation’s majority Malays, The Sun reports.
According to the news portal, Ahmad Zahid said the Malay population is “paying the price for being kind to non-Malays”.
“We allowed them to be indebted to us without needing them to pay it back; they are now insulting Islam and the Malays under the pretence of democracy, freedom of speech, and globalisation,” it quoted him as saying.
He also reportedly urged the Attorney-General to hasten high-profile cases involving racial and religious sensitivities, in light of allegations that the authorities have been slow to act against non-Malays.











 http://www.businessinsider.my/report-home-minister-accuses-non-malays-of-being-arrogant/#.VAWEvqCri_A


































































































Zahid Hamidi: Malays paying price of non-Malay arrogance

RTR2NB0P-642x458Umno vice-president and Home Minister Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi says that Malays are paying the price for being kind to non-Malays.
According to a report in the Sundaily, Zaid said that non-Malays are getting increasingly arrogant and are insulting the bumiputras, the royalty and Islam.

The report yesterday, quoted him as saying that "We allowed them to be indebted to us without needing them to pay it back; they are now insulting Islam and the Malays under the pretence of democracy, freedom of speech, and globalisation.".
Speaking at the Umno Segambut divisional meeting yesterday, the minister said that he attributed this to the perception that foreign cultural norms are inherently better than Malaysia's, and urged non-Malays to respect the bumiputras.
Ahmad Zahid also asked that Attorney-General Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail to fast track high-profile sedition cases to "protect the government's credibility and stave off accusations of selective prosecution".











 http://www.rakyattimes.com/index.php/news/1149-zaid-hamidi-malays-paying-price-of-non-malay-arrogance






























































































Zahid's 'non-Malays arrogant' remark 'seditious'


Home Minister Ahmad Zahid Hamidi should also be charged under the Sedition Act for accusing non-Malays of being arrogant, Gerakan said today.

Gerakan's Youth wing deputy chief Andy Yong said although he was not in favour of the Act, especially with it being so “easy” to charge law lecturer Azmi Sharom, he did not see why the same could not be applied to Zahid.
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Zahid Hamidi: Majority of non-Malays moderate, respect other races

Zahid Hamidi
Zahid Hamidi

KUALA LUMPUR: The majority of the non-Malay communities in Malaysia are moderates who respect the sentiments and sensitivities of other races, Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi said.
He said a newspaper report that quoted him as saying that non-Malays were getting increasingly arrogant and insulting the bumiputras, the royalty and Islam had been taken out of context.
He said he was referring to leaders and supporters of the DAP, in his speech, who lacked respect for the feelings of the Malays.
Zahid said this was evident in comments made by the opposition party and their supporters, especially those posted on pro-opposition news portals and the social media.
The Umno vice-president said the Barisan Nasional had non-Malay component parties and certainly they were not racists in their approach and that decisions affecting the country were discussed.
The power sharing approach and consensus-making were the hallmark of Barisan's success.
“But it cannot be denied that DAP supporters had taken a different approach with their arrogant method of politicking,” he said when contacted.
An English daily had quoted him as saying that Malays were paying the price of being kind to non-Malays and that the latter was getting increasingly arrogant.
He was reported as saying that the insults were made under the pretext of democracy, freedom of speech and globalisation.
Zahid said he would not have endorsed those who made insulting remarks against the non-Malay communities, citing police actions against these culprits.



























Non-Malays getting arrogant says Ahmad Zahid

September 2, 2014
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Zahid-Hamidi
(The Sun Daily) – Malays are paying the price for being kind to non-Malays, said Umno vice-president Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi.
He said non-Malays are getting increasingly arrogant and are insulting the bumiputras, the royalty and Islam.
“We allowed them to be indebted to us without needing them to pay it back; they are now insulting Islam and the Malays under the pretence of democracy, freedom of speech, and globalisation,” he said when launching the Umno Segambut divisional meeting today.
He attributed this to the perception that foreign cultural norms are inherently better than Malaysia’s, and urged non-Malays to respect the bumiputras.
Ahmad Zahid, who is home minister, also urged Attorney-General Tan Sri Abdul Gani Patail to expedite high-profile sedition cases to protect the government’s credibility and stave off accusations of selective prosecution.
He was responding to Umno Segambut division chief Kamaruddin Ambok’s allegation that Malays are being selectively prosecuted while those who insulted Malays, royalty and Islam are escaping quick punishment.
For example, Kamaruddin said, the road rage incident involving Siti Fairrah Ashykin Kamaruddin, otherwise known as Kiki, saw her sentenced in court within eight days of the act while Seputeh MP Teresa Kok is still free.
He was referring to Kok’s political satire video “Onederful Malaysia”, which was posted on the internet during this year’s Chinese New Year celebrations. Kok is facing a sedition charge over the video.
Kamaruddin cited many other cases where non-Malays posted inflammatory comments on the social media and said this is a sign that non-bumiputras in the country are getting increasingly “biadap” and “kurang ajar”.
He said this is because the Malay community is divided and weak, and there are now even Malays joining DAP, a multi-racial but majority Chinese opposition party.













 http://www.malaysia-today.net/non-malays-getting-arrogant-says-ahmad-zahid/


























































































Dato' Seri Zahid Hamidi displays the worst traits of a minister who is arrogant, ignorant and shockingly forgetful 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 http://mybaru1.blogspot.com/2012/01/dato-seri-zahid-hamidi-displays-worst.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 




Zahid Hamidi has to answer to civil suit filed by businessman over assault 

 

 

 

 

 Zahid Hamidi has to answer to civil suit filed by businessman over assault
Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi
Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi
PUTRAJAYA, June 27 — Home Minister Datuk Seri Dr Ahmad Zahid Hamidi would have to answer to a civil suit brought against him by a businessman over an assault allegation.
This is because he failed in his attempt to have the suit struck out.
Court of Appeal President Tan Sri Md Raus Shariff, chairing a five-member panel, denied Ahmad Zahid leave to appeal against a decision of a High Court which had disallowed his (Ahmad Zahid’s) application to strike out the suit.
“The matter has not gone through trial at the High Court in Shah Alam and you are not deprived of an appeal process. After the trial you can appeal. Let the trial proceed in the High Court,” he said.
He said if the court were to entertain every interlocutory appeal, it would delay other cases.
Justice Md Raus, who presided on the panel with Chief Judge of Sabah and Sarawak Tan Sri Richard Malanjum and Federal Court judges Tan Sri Abdull Hamid Embong, Tan Sri Suriyadi Halim Omar and Datuk Zainun Ali, ordered Ahmad Zahid to pay RM5,000 in legal costs to Amir Bazli Abdullah.
Earlier, Ahmad Zahid’s lawyer Datuk Shamsul Bahrain Ibrahim applied to the court for leave to appeal to the Federal Court, saying that five legal questions had been posed for the determination of the Federal Court.
Justice Raus said issues raised by Shamsul Bahrain were factual and it should be tried before the High Court.
The trial at the High Court is fixed for Aug 26 and 27.
Amir Bazli, 42, filed the suit for damages on July 4, 2007, claiming that Ahmad Zahid punched him in the face on Jan 16, 2006, at the Country Heights Recreational Club in Kajang and caused him to suffer a nasal bone fracture and a swollen left eye.
Ahmad Zahid applied to the High Court to strike out the suit on Aug 29, 2006, on the grounds that it (the suit) was trivial.
The High Court dismissed his application on April 21, 2010. The Court of Appeal, on March 15 last year, also dismissed Ahmad Zahid’s appeal.
Ahmad Zahid filed a counter-claim against Amir Bazli for damages for considerable distress, embarrassment, anxiety suffered by him and also damages for libel over publication of the alleged incident after Amir Bazli had gone to the media.
In his statement of defence, Ahmad Zahid, who was then Deputy Information Minister, denied that he ever delivered any punch on Amir Bazli causing injury to his face, claiming that it was Amir Bazli’s own concoction. – BERNAMA










































































Suspend Zahid Hamidi till assault case cleared, PM told 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Suspend Zahid Hamidi till assault case cleared, PM told

June 02, 2013
KUALA LUMPUR, June 2 – Datuk Seri Najib Razak was today challenged to temporarily remove from his Cabinet Datuk Seri Ahmad Zahid Hamidi – who has been sued for assault – to prove he is serious about government reform.
Opposition lawmaker Gobind Singh Deo (picture) told the prime minister that it is “improper” to put a man who has been ordered to answer a civil suit for assault in charge of the powerful home ministry where his actions and conduct could invite conflict, which would reflect on his Barisan Nasional (BN) government.
“[Leading] the Home Ministry now, which is responsible for the police would to my mind, put Zahid in a position of conflict.
“The Home Ministry is one of the most powerful ministries, with significant influence over various bodies including the police and prisons,” the Puchong MP said, adding in his statement that its minister must be seen as one who is “above and beyond these agencies as he needs to maintain independence”.
Gobind reminded Najib that the PM had promised to raise the quality of governance after winning reelection in the May 5 polls and must therefore show he is committed to carrying out his transformation.
“Will the Prime Minister remove him pending the outcome of the trial or will he resort to the same old indifferent attitude and silence proving yet again that he is incapable of the change he promises?” the DAP man asked.
Ahmad Zahid had been sued by businessman Amir Abdullah Bazli for allegedly punching him in the on January 16, 2006 at the Country Heights recreational club in Kajang, Selangor causing the latter to suffer a nasal bone fracture and a swollen left eye.
Then a deputy information minister, Ahmad Zahid had denied the allegation and applied to the Kuala Lumpur High Court for the case to be thrown out. The application was dismissed by the same court on April 21, 2010.
He later filed a countersuit against the 41-year-old, claiming to have suffered humiliation and emotional trauma as a result of the accusation.
But last year, a three-judge panel of the Court of Appeal unanimously ruled against Zahid’s bid to strike out the assault suit and ordered the minister to pay RM5,000 in costs. It also ordered Zahid to respond to the action.